MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

Dose rhino mean 100% abortion?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Abortion and Pregnancy Loss » Dose rhino mean 100% abortion? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Paula (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 12:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi, I just purchased a mare and when we got to the farm to pick her up we noticed that all of the horses, babies and adults had runny noses. The mare has a slight runny nose and has coughed once that I witnessed. She is approximatly 10 months into gestation. When I asked if they were vaccinated for Rhino the previous owner said no. How would I know if she has Rhino or something else? Would it be 100% fatal for the foal. I can see the foal moving quite vigourously at this time. I would hate to loose it now, any info or suggestions would be appreciated.
 

Jan H
Yearling
Username: Jan_h

Post Number: 87
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 07:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos would be the best person to to answer this question, but reading your post I just have to ask, why in the world would you buy this mare if you saw so many other horses there have an obvious illness? If it were me and I saw that, I would high tail it back home. I hope your mare keeps the foal and does not get the illness all the other horses seemed to have. She and foal will be in my prayers.
 

Paula Rollins
Neonate
Username: Paula

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 10:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, I agree, but I had bought the mare two months ago and everyone was healthy. The owner had just been holding her until I could drive the 10 hours to get her. When we got there is the first I had known of the sickness that had come through his place. If had known ahead of time I would have requested that he keep her until everyone was healthy. If I would not have had a seperate place away from my other horses I would not have brought her home. She is six miles away were there are no horses. But I do agree with you, just circumstances that I didn't know about.
 

Lisa Weir
Breeding Stock
Username: Pals_pal

Post Number: 145
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 10:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think if it were EHV, the normal time for abortion would be around 8 months. I'm not 100% certain, though. And I believe it isn't 100% certain to cause abortion, as I've heard not every mare on affected properties will abort, but usually act as carriers.
Was the runny nose really watery, or more custardy? And what colour was it? Gross questions I know, but that could answer a lot more for you.

Where is Jos hiding?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10479
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 10:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Your vet should be able to advise you if it is EHV ("Rhino") or not. It would not be 100% in causing abortion, but I would certainly want to find out. Note that a neonate born to a mare with active EHV Can succumb to the disease after a live birth too.

Talk to your vet.
 

Paula Rollins
Neonate
Username: Paula

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 11:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

She has an appointment later today. So hopefully it is nothing more than a cold, but if it were EHV what would the duration of the active state be? If she does have it is the foal sick inside or just exposed at birth? Her runny nose is a slight drainage of slightly milky white snot. The sickest horse at the property in question was a weanling that had thick sticky yellow drainage.Other than the little bit of a runny nose she seems to be bright and active. One other thing I noticed on her that may or may not be related is the scelera in her eyes seemed to be red when she would look far enough over that it could be seen? Thanks for everybodys help!
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 122
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 02:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos- we have an illness going through our horses right now too, all of ours were vaccinated with Ft Dogde's 5 way last summer and those who were pregnant were given their 4 way vaccine and have had their pneumobort shots on schedule. Whatever this is, it causes a runny nose, cough and depressed appetite. We did bring some horses in from out of state recently though none of them have been sick but I'm assuming they could have brought a "new bug" with them. Any suggestions on what this might be? Most of them are clearing up after a week or so, but I'm concerned about the new foals which should be arriving at any time.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10481
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 11:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Abortion due to EHV-1 usually occurs late in pregnancy between 8-11 months of gestation but can be as early as 4 months. The incubation period is highly variable with abortions occurring from 10 days to 4 months after initial infection. Most abortions occur within 30 days of the presumed initial exposure. Abortion is usually spontaneous with the mare showing no signs of the impending abortion and the placenta is usually passed covering the foal. Foals that are aborted before 6 months of gestation may be severely autolysed. At full term infected foals may be born alive but are often abnormal from birth with signs of weakness, jaundice and difficulty in breathing. These foals usually die rapidly within one to three days but occasionally some foals may survive longer. (Courtesy AEVA, where there is more information on EHV).

I hope that what you are looking at is some minor "sniffles" virus, but I am a tad alarmed by your observation "... a weanling that had thick sticky yellow drainage...", which rings alarm bells for strangles... hope it's not!

E Watkins - pretty much impossible to hypothesize what your seeing via the Internet! You can have your vet runs swabs and cultures if you really want to know though...
 

Lisa Weir
Breeding Stock
Username: Pals_pal

Post Number: 146
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 08:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for that link, Jos. I have printed it out and will give it to our staff to read. :-)

Here in WA we have been relatively lucky regarding EHV-1. But in the last two years we have heard of a couple of abortions that were attributed to it. One was a mare who was bought from an out of state sale and the other was a local mare who traveled interstate to be covered.

Both mares were vanned to our property for cover this year and the owners were honest up front, allowing us to take precautions so that the teaser and covering stallion were denied nose to nose contact with all mares from the farms in question. They never had contact with any other horse on the farm.

In my humble opinion this disease is a reason for AI to become practice in thoroughbreds, even if you take all other arguments out of the picture.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 129
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 08:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos- will do, I just was hoping you would tell me since we'd vaccinated that it wasn't possible for it to be rhino, since horses that WERE vaccinated are coming down with it too..I guess it's time to have the vet back out and do some cultures. Thanks. EW



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US