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Mare with Antibiotic Resitant Infection

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » Mare with Antibiotic Resitant Infection « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Jamie
Posted From: 66.100.119.81
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is a great discussion forum. I am hoping someone can give me some incite on a problem I am having with one of my mares. I have a 20 year old mare who has had five foals. I tried to breed her last year & this spring by AI. She did not catch. I sent her away to the breeding farm where they ran tests and she has an infection that is resistant to antibiotics. They have tried a Betadine solution flush and on the next culture the bacteria shows some resistance to antibiotics. They then treated her with antibiotics. The next heat the cultured her and she has the full resistant infection back. They now are saying that they are going to try plasma. Has anyone had anything like this happen? Does plasma work? Am I wasting money on this mare? She is a really nice mare with some great babies or I wouldn't be going to this length with her. Any information is greatly appreciated. Thanks for your help. Jamie
 

Jos
Posted From: 137.186.22.227
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 11:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

  1. Was there a cytology smear prepared in conjunction with the culture that supported the culture findings? See the article on the importance of a cytology smear for more information.
  2. What was the pathogen identified?
  3. Have you used the oxytocin protocol outlined on this site, or something similar with this mare?
  4. Have you had a uterine biopsy performed on this mare?
  5. Is the veterinarian that is working on the mare well-versed in equine reproduction, or only a general practice vet doing some equine reproduction work?
Those are the areas I would start asking questions about first...


 

Jamie T
Posted From: 66.100.119.81
Posted on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 12:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Jos for the reply.
Here are the answers I know to your questions.
1)Not sure, but I will be calling today. Thanks for the heads up. My vet here did do a cytology and said it looked good early this spring before I sent her to the breeding farm. After reading that article it is throwing up a red flag.
2)I didn't get a name but they said that the lab tested it against a wide range of antibiotics and it shows resistant. I will call and try to get the name of the pathogen.
3)They did use oxytocin the last time they bred her and they kept a close eye on the amount of fluid in the uterus. The oxytocin didn't eliminate it so they did a flush to clear it.
4) I don't think there has been a biopsy done. Should I request one at this point?
5) This veterinarian is supposed to be one of the best repro vets in Texas. He does a few large reputable stallion stations and ranches that I know of.

They also mentioned that they put her on some immunity boosting supplements as well to help her body fight the infection.

I hate to keep calling and bugging them, but she has been there since mid May and I am starting to get concerned. They said that it is too late to breed, but that they are trying to get her cleaned up for next spring. I will call them back in the next day or so and see what I can find out. I think I should have posted this here before I took her down there. Maybe I wouldn't have spent all of the money I have spent on her the last two months.
 

Jos
Posted From: 137.186.22.150
Posted on Friday, July 30, 2004 - 12:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Don't hate to keep calling. They are your "employees"... you are [presumably] paying them for the services they are performing... you have as much right to be kept informed of what they are doing as they have of being paid for it! :-)
 

Jamie T
Posted From: 66.100.119.81
Posted on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 03:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, I have found out a little more information on my mare. They have not been running a cytology in conjunction with the cultures. He said that they usually do not do a cytology or a biopsy. He said that the biopsy only takes a small sample from the uterus and that sample may or may not be a good reading on the condition of the entire uterus. Also they have not identified the pathogen in the cultures they have taken. They did do the plasma treatment and are waiting for her to come back into heat to see if it has helped to clear up the infection. At this point do I request a cytology and/or a biopsy with the next culture?

Thanks for the help.
 

Jamie T
Posted From: 66.100.119.81
Posted on Tuesday, August 24, 2004 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I went ahead and requested a biopsy and a cytology. What do you know, from the cytology it looks like we are dealing with a fungus, not a bacteria. The biopsy results are not back yet. I think that this explains why the unidentified paththogen was resistant to antibiotics, plasma treatment, etc.

Once the results are in from the biopsy we should know more. I am sure that I am dealing with a whole new beast when it comes to a fungus. Can someone tell me if I have a chance getting my mare in foal next year? If so, what are the best treatments?

I wish I had asked more questions earlier. The farm mentioned that this is very rare. Is that true?

Thanks Again!
 

Jos
Posted From: 165.121.195.8
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 12:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, now you know another reason why one should always perform a cytology smear! :-) Glad you found it, sorry it took so long!!

Fungal infections, though not common are certainly not "very rare" - unless of course it is some unusual form of fungus! Unfortunately there tends to be more likelihood of endometrial damage as a result of a fungal infection rather than a bacterial infection, so once you have the problem cleared up, it might be advisable to run the biopsy again... Treatments will depend upon what is identified, but may range in manner from povidone-iodine infusions to other more irritating infusions. Hopefully your vet. will be able to advise you. If you are not comfortable with the recommendation, you might like to contact a veterinary teaching university for a second opinion.
 

Jamie T
Posted From: 66.100.119.81
Posted on Wednesday, August 25, 2004 - 04:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos you are a Godsend!

I spoke with the vet today and he mentioned that her biopsy came back bad. I think he said 3A was the grade. He did think that we can get her cleaned up and try to do an Embryo Transfer next spring and then try to let her carry one after that. I feel a ton better about what we are doing with her. I actually feel like we have a little hope there.

Anyway, thanks for the invaluable information. I am looking forward to attending the Terre Haute seminar!

Jamie
 

Diane Bolin
Posted From: 161.114.1.182
Posted on Friday, September 17, 2004 - 06:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This has been a very interesting read. I too have an 18 year old mare that we have not had in foal since her last foal of 1999. We gave her one year off to rest after two large babies in a row. Probably not the best idea.

In 2000, after going to the vet to make sure she was okay to breed again, we took her back to the same stallion. The first time she did not conceive. The second time, in the process of doing a live cover, she urinated while the stallion was entering. We figured that was a wash and took her to the vet to get her checked. He infused her and also ran another culture and did a uterine biopsy. I'm not sure what else he performed at that time. I believe she did end up with a bacteria infection and we treated her for that. She came up clean. The biopsy said she had a 70 percent chance of conception.

So we proceeded to go to another stallion that only did AI figuring we would at least keep her clean that way. She never left our property except for the last breeding with that stallion - for convenience sake only. Again - no success.

After four years of trying to get her in foal, we took her to another stallion, this time with live cover figuring it may be the AI and she was sensitive to the extender. She had a good heat cycle but still came up open. Since that was an August breeding, we decided not to try again that year.

This year, I took her to another vet who did the culture and was informed of her history. We allowed the culture to grow, and sure enough it too was a fungus. It turned out to be a yeast infection. That was in February. It took until June to get her clean with various types of chemicals to clean out the yeast.

We too were told to get her in foal once we got her clean and then keep her in foal. So we tried to breed her by AI and it was probably too soon after some heavy treatments that may have caused the uterus to be sensitive and not allow the fetus to attach. She did show in foal on day 14, but by the end of the week, she was open again. So we tried the second time with the same results. This was the best we had done in four years. All the other times, we never had conception.

Again, it was late in the breeding season so before bringing her home we had another culture done and sure enough she had a bacteria growing. When we went to pick her up after the length of time for the treatment, the culture was now growing a yeast infection again.

This time we tried a natural process that may surprise many of you and you all may think I have totally lost my mind. We ground up garlic cloves and added a couple of pinches of cayanne pepper in distilled water and did this for four days. We took her back to the vet in three weeks to reculture and the yeast was gone.

However, there was another contaminate growing so I need to return her in three weeks for another culture.

I was told this mare has a poor immune system, but hasn't come up sick otherwise. I give her garlic powder along with minerals and vitamins when I can get it down her, but she is an easy keeper so will leave the powder and prefer to be stubborn. All of my other horses have no problem eating the garlic powder and she is the main one that needs it.

The suggested course is to breed in the spring and flush the embryo. Since this is not a 100 percent guarantee of a baby, I'm not sure about spending more money on top of thousands that we have already spent over the last four years. I could have purchased the horse of my dreams rather than try to breed for one. <g>

What do you recommend to help build the immune system? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

I was also told that alfalfa being a sweet hay could cause the yeast to grow since sugars feed yeast. Is this true? We have her on a well balanced pellet feed with an alfalfa base. And when we do feed her hay, it is a coastal hay. We were giving her a treat of alfalfa thinking we were being nice to her. Maybe not.
 

Jos
Posted From: 4.230.3.245
Posted on Friday, September 17, 2004 - 11:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Have you used the oxytocin protocol outlined on this site, or something similar with this mare? Post-breeding endometritis as a result of delayed uterine clearance is one of the (if not the) leading causes of EED in older mares.

$6 of oxytocin might make all the difference... more so than the garlic treatment, which although may treat a variety of problems does lead me to wonder if it was not connected with the reappearance of another pathogen... how sterile was the garlic?

What about cytology smears? Are they showing neutrophil presence in association with the alleged presence of pathogens? You are getting a cytology smear performed aren't you?
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 67.10.56.67
Posted on Sunday, September 19, 2004 - 12:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'll have to check with my vet to see what procedures they did.

As to the garlic treatment, my vet did this so I have to assume great care was involved in mixing this treatment solution.

 

Jamie T
Posted From: 66.100.119.81
Posted on Wednesday, September 29, 2004 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Diane, That does sound pretty similar to my situation. Please keep up posted on what happens with your mare.

The latest on my mare is that they have cleared up the fungus. She should be ready to come home soon. Jos, do you recommend I have another biopsy done now that the fungus is cleared up?



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