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Where to begin with 21year old mare?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » Where to begin with 21year old mare? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Dani
Posted From: 69.29.229.187
Posted on Friday, July 09, 2004 - 02:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have just agreed to purchase(pending she settles) a awesome mare. She is a 21year old mare who had 7 foals previously. Last foal in 1999. She was not bred in 1999, or 2000. Then was pastured with a stallion in 2001, 2002 and 2003 but never became pregnant. The stallion had 5 or 6 mares with him each year and only has settled one mare in 2002 and 2003, and 3 mares in 2001. So he is in decline fertility wise. Mare has never been ultrasounded, cultured, flushed etc. Long story short..this mare is a gamble but I am willing to try. Where do I begin this late in the year? Ultrasounds? Cultures? Flushes? Does she have to be in heat to do all of this? I want to do this right from the start.
Thanks in advance! Dani
 

twhgait
Posted From: 167.79.91.21
Posted on Friday, July 09, 2004 - 12:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

At her age and with her foaling history, she may take a longer time to settle then a younger mare would. Being open for awhile at her age usually doesn't help either, as older mares tend to be easier to settle if they are bred year after year without missing a year. You can have a culture and ultrasound all done at your convenience (the mare doesn't have to be in heat). I would highly recommend a full reproductive workup (palpation, ultrasound, culture) prior to any attempts at insemination/breeding. This way you can treat any potential problems (with antibiotic flushes, etc) before they become actual "problems" with getting the mare settled. It's money spent wisely-and money you may end up spending anyway on repeated attempts at breeding unsuccessfully. Good Luck!!!
 

Ruth
Posted From: 64.223.152.248
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 06:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi I have a 23 year old mare who last summmer went into heat regularly I would like to breed her and phisically she is in great shape is she too old?
 

shan jones (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 24.225.253.255
Posted on Sunday, May 01, 2005 - 11:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 24 year old mare that has not been bred in several years.she is very infrequently in season and is always lactating she also has had problems with grass induced laminitis in the past she is in very good health . what do you think about her being bread again
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.157
Posted on Sunday, May 01, 2005 - 01:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If you are game to be patient and follow all the recommended protocols for insuring a pregnancy, then have it!

I did get a 24 year old maiden mare in foal, only to have the owners fail to caslick and keep her on Regumate the first 90 days. She aborted soon after. It was a lot of work for the mare and me.

Watch her on the laminitis problem, and leave nothing to chance. With her being in good shape, you are ahead of the game. Good Luck
 

Joanie Davison
Neonate
Username: Joanied

Post Number: 9
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2006 - 05:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My two cents... breeding a mare over age 20 is risky at best.
I read story after story about mares in their 20's that have ruptured during birthing and die.
I just don't think a person should keep breeding them at that age...I realize many mares 20+ years old are foaling just fine... I am a Thoroughbred person and get the BloodHorse magazine...every year I read about top notch mares into their 20's that rupture during birthing. If it were me...I'd tell her thanks for all the foals she gave me and retire her to be a 'baby sitter'.

Just my two cents.
 

Emma
Breeding Stock
Username: Emma

Post Number: 152
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2006 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The reason breeders keep breeding these good old mares is because it would cost them to much if they didn't. A lot of times it is just about the money. Where would you suggest these old mares be retiered any how? How many 'Baby Sitters' do you think one stud needs? In a lot of cases the mares would just be put to sleep so why not breed them fr a few more years while they are healthy and coping. These old girls don't have a future if they are not breeding. I don't see to many retirment stables, agistment centres around that take in old tierd broodmares ...
 

Beverly Outlaw
Breeding Stock
Username: Outlawpaints

Post Number: 104
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2006 - 07:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree there is a risk you take with an older mare, but if you have a really good mare that pines away to be pregnant i don't see why it would hurt. We have a 21 yr old quarter horse and she just had a GORGEOUS little colt in December. She is happier and actually does not have to be bred again, but it will be up to her. If she wants it or not...

But you do take a risk of something going wrong with the mare or the foal. the same mare i talked about had a colt from the previous year and it was just a gorgeous as the one now, but it was a dummy foal. we did everything we could, but after three days we finally ended it. I guess it is a hard decision to make.

Good Luck in your choosing!
 

Lloyd
Neonate
Username: Lloyd

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 07:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

For what it is worth, we have a 22 year old quarter horse mare that has had at least 9 foals that we know of (bought her at 9 years old) and has been open for the last 9 years. She was bred last spring, and her body condition and spirits are as good or better than she has looked in several years. She is what we refer to as a "drive by breeder" because she only has to look at a stud to get in foal. It is my opinion that she lives to be a mother and we will give her that opportunity as long as her health and body condition allow. Some mares are not able to handle the physical stress as their bodies age, so it has to be taken on a case by case basis. Let their condition score be your first guidline, but never hesitate to have a vet do a full evaluation if you have any doubts.
 

j (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 66.68.29.162
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 10:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

it will also KILL many mares to go through a foaling season where babies are all around and not get one. If my mare doesn't settle she has to be kept seperate from all foals and will run the fence line night and day trying to get to them. She calls all day, its HEARTBREAKING. She even starts making milk. There is much evidence that mares live longer when kept in foal regularly as well. These are not humans, they are made to be able to breed throughout life. You can't compare them to people or dogs....they are horses, this is the way they are made.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10465
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, February 22, 2006 - 12:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

breeding a mare over age 20 is risky at best

I can't agree with that I'm afraid! :-)

While there is a minimal increase in the chance of uterine artery rupture in older mares, it is accepted that the risk is not significant enough to preclude breeding. There are many mares that are in their 20's that foal out without trouble each year and indeed become pregnant with subsequent foals.

I will concede that it may require more work to get these mares pregnant in the first place, but we breed many many mares in their 20's each year that foal out successfully the next year without trouble.
 

Rebecca Aller
Neonate
Username: Cameo911

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 02:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am thinking about purchasing a mare that has had 11 babies and one on the way in October. What is the most babies you have heard a mare have? The mare is an awesome producer and I would love to get a baby from her out of my stud.



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