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Pregnant?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » Pregnant? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 160.129.142.26
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 03:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I know this is a common subject because none of us want to believe our efforts at getting our mare bred have failed. I know this seems like a silly question but I have to ask. What are the chances of a vet missing a fetus at a 70 days of pregnancy check with a ultrasound machine. My mare was ultrasounded positive at 22 days then ultrasound negative at 70 days. Does the fetus reach a stage of development where it is to big for ultrasound to clearly detect?
 

Jos
Posted From: 165.121.167.121
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - 08:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

At 70 days the fetus is highly evident on ultrasound, so missing it is unlikely, even though the entire fetus may not be visible in a single screen as it is too large. In addition, there is a large amount of fluid present in the pregnant mare, so even if one misses the fetus itself, the presence of the clear (black on ultrasound) fluid should ring major bells!

After about 90 days of pregnancy, the size of the developing fetus usually pulls the uterus over the pelvic brim, and it can become difficult to palpate/ultrasound until about day 150 when the size increases to the point where it becomes evident once again.
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 24.198.84.251
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 10:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Help,
I bred my mare in April and now the breeding facility is questioning the pregnancy. This is the 2nd year for this and this horse. Last year she was bred and in November there was no foal on the ultrasound. I told the breeding facility this and they put her on regumate. My questions are.. if she is/was in foal and aborted at this stage wouldn't there be physical evidence, and how far along is it possible for a mare to reabsorb? What signs should I be seeing now? I will be devastated if she's not in foal. I just got this mare back after searching for her for 3 years! She is 11 years old.
 

Jos
Posted From: 63.176.185.165
Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 11:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There is no such thing as "reabsorbtion" (a.k.a. "resorption" or "reabsorption"). Any pregnancy that is lost is lost through the cervix. Granted, fluid may be absorbed, but tissue will pass through the cervix.

The problem is that depending upon what stage of pregnancy the mare is at when the pregnancy is lost, there may not be very much size to the embryo/fetus, so the aborted fetus is not going to be found in the bedding or pasture - and remember that if she is out in a pasture, there are very likely scavengers that would take any fetus away from the area too.

WRT to Regumate - it is not a snake-oil "cure all" for pregnancy loss, and is generally used way too much - take a look at the article on our site about Regumate for more information on that.

Abortions can occur right up to term, so if you have concerns, have the mare checked for pregnancy. If she is not pregnant, I would suggest that you have a thorough pre-breeding examination performed by a Theriogenologist (a veterinarian certified in reproduction), and that should include an endometrial biopsy.
 

Rebecca
Posted From: 209.226.130.34
Posted on Thursday, February 17, 2005 - 08:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mare is at approx. 242 days of gestation. Over he past 8 weeks, she's had 3 episodes of colic, ranging from the first which subsided with banamine and walking, the 2nd which was better after walking alone, and the third I thought she had a twisted intestine she was in so much pain and thrashing around. Usually after the intial episode, she'll be "off" on and off for the next couple days. I had the vet out after this last time; he did a rectal examination and concluded the colic results from the pressure exerted by the foal. However, I noticed a discharge on her last colic (the vet didn't seem too concerned with it so I didn't think twice about) but after someone suggested placentitis, I'm was wooried and checked last night and there was a thickish discharge. Nothing, however, this morning. Her udder doesn't look like it's filling up at all, but between the colic and the discharge, should she be put on Regumate and antibiotic? Even if it turns out not to be placentitis, would regumate still be helpful since she seems to be quite uncomfortable and these colics are probably putting undue stress on baby? Thanks
 

Rebecca
Posted From: 209.226.130.34
Posted on Thursday, February 17, 2005 - 08:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Actually after adding the days, she's at about 259 days, if this makes a difference.
 

Jennifer
Posted From: 198.7.249.124
Posted on Saturday, February 19, 2005 - 02:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I need some advice/help.

I am doing a term project on Nurse mare farms. If ANYONE has prices on colostrum costs. Delivery charges for mare and/or colostrum.
Insurance premiums for farms.
How long mare is off farm
Charge for mare to go somewhere.
ANY help would be greatly appreciated!
Thank you
 

Marni Falcon
Posted From: 4.227.101.0
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2005 - 09:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a three year old and this is my first time to have her pasture bred. How can I tell if she is bred before I take her to the vet?
 

TX.Breeder
Posted From: 199.3.209.42
Posted on Thursday, February 24, 2005 - 12:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The only way would be to wait until she would have cycled again. In that case. you would loose valuable time. An ultasound at day 15 or 16 would be the difinitive answer. It would also give the vet a chance to asses her condition and breeding viablity. I have known mares that have a distinct change of personality at around day 15 which coincides with maternal recognition. However, I still ultasound to insure that I am not wasting time, money and efforts.
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 66.82.9.62
Posted on Monday, March 07, 2005 - 02:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mare was bred last April. She was confirmed twice. Then she was manually palpated and ultrasounded at 160'ish days and declared open. Now she is/would have been 10 months. Her vulva is relaxing, she has colostrum, and her flank is moving. I can feel movement on her flank that pushes back. She is thin. Formerly, she was gaunt. Called my vet, he says she's not. What next?
 

twhgait
Posted From: 69.23.217.156
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 11:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would say anything is possible, including her being pregnant. Did the vet say "she's not" based upon the 160 day palp and u/s or did he come back out to see her? I would push for him to come back out to examine her again if he didn't. If she is pregnant, you'll need to get her vaccinated and you will need to be getting things together for delivery.
 

jrbutcher (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 209.209.148.138
Posted on Tuesday, August 09, 2005 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 3yr old rocky mnt, mare. She is showing all signs of pregnancy.We thought she would give birth in march but apparently we were wrong.she's now showing signs of foaling{for about a week now] but no baby yet. I am new to all this. Could someone please tell me what is going on with her? I called a vet but they are hard to get to come to check her.
 

Shawn Connerty
Neonate
Username: Domino7girl

Post Number: 1
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 09:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a miniature mare that has shown signs of pregnancy large belly milk bag etc. But was never vet checked for pregnancy. How long can a mare be in a false pregnancy ? My vet who does mostly full size horses tells me she wouldnt still be showing signs of pregnancy for this long if it was false. She was pasture bred until Sept 5 th of 05. Thanks for any help.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 981
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 10:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Although unusual, some mares may show signs of false pregnancy until the time when they would normally be foaling. As I say, it is unusual to see it last that long, but it does happen.



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