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Difficult to breed

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » Difficult to breed « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 216.209.223.57
Posted on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 05:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mare is a difficult horse to breed. She is very hostile to the stallion (re: kicking) even when she is in full heat. She will accept him but appears to only stand for one breeding. Each other attempt, she does not want to accept the stallion (dangerous kicking) although she is still in heat. Has anyone else had this experience with breeding. She did catch last year and produced a lovely foal as a maiden mare and I thought this year with "experience" behind her, she would be better in the breeding shed.
Any insight.
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 68.118.197.147
Posted on Tuesday, July 22, 2003 - 08:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Maybe AI would be better for her?
 

Sandy
Posted From: 65.56.47.74
Posted on Friday, July 25, 2003 - 01:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had a mare that was the same way. Even in full blown heat, would not stand for the stallion, would try to kick and everything. What we finally did was put breeding hobbles on her and put a twitch on her nose, she did not move a muscle and let the stud mount her and breed with no problems. The following year, she was perfect for breeding, never had to use the hobbles or the twitch again.
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 206.172.131.107
Posted on Thursday, July 31, 2003 - 07:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi again
I'm the person who posted the original question on difficult to breed. As the mare only stood for one breeding we had her checked by ultrasound today (day 13) to check for pregnancy. What my vet found was that she is not pregnant but has a well formed follicle and edema and will most likely ovulate tomorrow. We took her back to the stallion today and with the use of a twitch were able to breed her successfully with minimal kicking. She will also be covered again on Saturday. My question is, can a mare be bred if not in heat (as she didn't catch the first breeding although she exhibited squatting and urinating?). Is is possible she is short cycling and if so, what would the reason be ?
Thanks
 

Jos
Posted From: 142.177.114.165
Posted on Saturday, August 02, 2003 - 10:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would feel disinclined to rebreed based on a day 13 ultrasound examination alone if there is an absence of estrus behaviour. It is very easy to miss a pregnancy at 13 days.

Follicular presence is not indicative of non-pregnancy, although the edema is a more likely indicator. It would have been advisable to perhpas check this mares cervix to see if it was relaxed or not prior to breeding (relaxed = non-pregnant).

If the mare has indeed returned to estrus, and is truly on the verge of ovulation only 13 days after the previous ovulation, that is an indicator of possible pathogenic presence in her uterus. What did your culture and cytology show prior to the original breeding? Did you have one performed? Was there a cytology performed in conjunction with the culture? The results are worthless without (for more information on that, "click" here.
 

Barb
Posted From: 203.220.224.32
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - 08:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We have a mare that we have trouble with every year. She seems to have a heat of 7-9 days.
She goes OK if you hobble and tie her but I don't like doing that. She stood last year for stallion only once on day six and caught. She went off the next day. This year she stood on day six but anxiety seemed to take over and she left before the job was done.
She stood a second time and same thing. I put her and the stallion in a more confined space and everything went OK. I only did this because she was not exhibiting any aggression towards the stallion at this stage and I knew she would not be able to get hurt on railing. The stallion covered her successfully in no time. She went off the next day. I would not recommend this on maiden mares and I would not recommend this on a mare still exhibiting kicking. I also wouldn't recommend this for stallions without much experience with troublesome mares. If they are not quick enough they are likely to get hurt.
I know of someone else who has a mare that will only accept the stallion once, just before she goes off.
My mare was actually sold by owner before last as they believed they would never get her in foal, they believed she was barren. Last owner got surprise package in the shape of a roan colt in the paddock one morning. Consequently he decided to keep the foal and sold the mare to us. We have had two beautiful fillies out of her, unfortunately slipped foal last year and hopefully will deliver another beauty next year.
Good luck !!!!!!!!!!
 

Sandy
Posted From: 4.228.165.26
Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2004 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's the deal,
All of my mares are seasoned, experienced breeding mares. I have a two year old stud colt that I wanted to breed to two of the mares this year.
Well, every single time the mares come into heat, they will not let this colt mount them! They will show signs of heat like crazy to my older stallion, but then nothing at all to the young stallion. I should mention that the young stallion has been running with the herd of mares since he was 5 mos. old. He does know how to tease them, and he is actually quite the gentleman about it, but they do not even so much as raise their tails to him. They will actually pin their ears and drive him off. But 30 seconds later I can take them to the older stallion and they are standing there winking, peeing and squatting.
I actually had resorted to tying the one mare near the older stallion and letting him tease her up while I brought the young stallion up from behind and let him breed her. Two days later when I tried breeding this same mare with the young stud, she would not show to him again and I had to go through the whole thing all over again with teasing with the older stud while the young stud got her from behind. I actually think this mare did get in foal to the young stud because she is 25 days past her last breeding and has not come into heat as of yet.
Now today, the other mare is in heat, when teased with the older stud, but then when I took her back to the young stud, she squealed, pinned her ears and tried to kick. And he was trying his darndest to tease her up! He would nicker to her, sniff up and down her legs, lick her legs, everything. Now, my older stud will tease much more aggressively. He is very vocal and acts like a raging idiot when he teases the mares, and they show to him like crazy!
I just don't get it. Is it because the young stallion isn't aggressive enough in his teasing or is it because he has ran with the herd?
Any input would be appreciated because this is driving me nuts!
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 203.220.224.159
Posted on Friday, June 25, 2004 - 11:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have not previously had my mares ultrasounded for pregnancy as we are quite far from the vet and have our own stallion but for two years in a row my older mare (now 17) has aborted twins, one set at about 7 months and one set at about 6 months. Each time one appears to be healthy but the other twin appears to have died inside her. Would anyone hazard a guess to this happening again. She is a Thoroughbred and has always had 8 or nine day heats.
 

Jos
Posted From: 165.121.167.132
Posted on Friday, June 25, 2004 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Older mares in particular are more likely to twin. It is natures way of increasing the chance of a pregnancy in a mare that is possibly less fertile as a result of age-related changes.

As you now know, it is not worth the risk of not ultrasounding mares at a time when twins can be detected and dealt with (14-15 days post-ovulation is ideal).

Plan on getting your mare ultrasounded - the risk of twins again in this mare is high.



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