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Trailering after breeding

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » Trailering after breeding « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Trisha
Posted From: 130.189.70.164
Posted on Monday, June 02, 2003 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi there. I have a 20 y.o. broodmare who just had her first foal. We are looking at rebreeding her later this summer. She will be travelling 2.5 hours to the stud. She is not very happy about trailering, but does well as long as you are moving. We are thinking of trailering home soon after last cover as we are wanting to get her started before weaning. What are the problems with trailering mare and foal as well as trailering mare just barely bred. Caught on first breeding last year. No probs with pregnancy. We could wait until weaning, but would have to wean baby right at 4 mo for an August breed. Which is better?
Thanks.
Trisha
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 152.163.253.66
Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2003 - 01:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't understand why so many people want to breed mares while they have a foal on their side. Most horse owners are female. Those of us with kids know that it takes time for the uterus to heal. Are so many people really interested in money more than they are interested in the health of their mares. I breed my mares every other season. How would you like to be pregnant all the time?
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 200.64.191.51
Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2003 - 02:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It seems a little strange that mares come into heat naturally about 10 days after foaling, and can conceive. It seems even stranger that it happens regularly in the wild herds of horses where no money changes hands and people are not involved! :-)

Horses are not people, and it is important that one not anthropomorphize, as doing so will result in an erroneous conclusion such as the concept that equine parenthood is the same as human!
 

Trisha
Posted From: 64.65.233.43
Posted on Wednesday, August 27, 2003 - 04:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As the original poster on this, I would like to comment. Neither my current foal, nor the next one will be sold. My baby, who is just about 5 mos, and about to be weaned will be my next show horse. The next baby will be my sister's next show horse. The mare was not being rebred until at least 4 mos after she foaled, which was more than enough time for her uterus to heal. She is 20, the last foal was her first, and this one will be her last. She is a wonderful mare, mother and competitor. I hope my baby and my sister's are half the horse their mother is, because they just don't make them like her anymore. I do appreciate your concern for Abby's welfare though. I do agree with you. I never would have considered foal heat nor 30 heat rebreeding due the nature of foaling and the desire for her to be as physiologically healed as possbible. As I am sure you know, since she is older, it is better not to let her have too much time off between foals as their fertility can rapidly decrease at this age. As an aside note, we decided to go AI, so transportation became a non-issue.
 

Mane Tyme Morgans
Posted From: 66.186.179.244
Posted on Thursday, August 28, 2003 - 09:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I personally DO NOT like breeded yearly. I did however do it once. But will NEVER do it again. The mare IMHO needs to have time between foals. I know I would not want to get Pregnant right after having a child. LOL.

 

Trisha
Posted From: 209.187.120.129
Posted on Thursday, August 28, 2003 - 12:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Once again, as the original poster, I feel the need to comment. I came to equine-reproduction.com as a novice breeder looking for info and advice from people and vets who have more experience than I do. There is a wealth of really good information on this site, and many of the posters are doing just what I am, sharing experiences, giving and receiving input. There are a few out there however who seem to feel this area is a sounding board to judge and condemn those of us who do thing differently than they do. I appreciate Mane Tyme putting their name on the above post, and the fact that is a sharing of experience and info. However, the initial response to my message had nothing to do with the topic, and was condemning of a situation that that person knew nothing about. I do not believe negativity has any place here on the boards, and yet I feel justified in this message. If you don't have anything useful to say about the topic in which you are posting, please do not post.
 

Cathy
Posted From: 67.1.6.80
Posted on Thursday, August 28, 2003 - 03:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The stud I used the last 4 years is an 8 hr drive one way. I leave my mares until they are ultrasounded at 15 days. I pick them up within a day or two and bring them home. I have not lost a pregnancy yet. I read a study s few years ago about trailering mares. They didn't have any higher embryonic death with trailering than without. Cathy
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 68.118.197.147
Posted on Thursday, August 28, 2003 - 04:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Trisha,
I'm doing the same thing. Both of my mares are 20. When they foal next year, they will be bred right back. From what I've learned, that is what's best for the OLDER mare. Anyway, truck to and from the mare station often. It's only a half hour away, but like I said it's often. I would leave her there until her 15 day check. That way, if you need to start over, you can do so with her next heat. It's worth the extra money. It sounds like you have a special mare...best of luck to you:-)
 

Mane Tyme Morgans
Posted From: 66.186.168.28
Posted on Friday, August 29, 2003 - 07:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"Caught on first breeding last year. No probs with pregnancy. We could wait until weaning, but would have to wean baby right at 4 mo for an August breed. Which is better? "

Thought that is what you asked. Isn't it. I know many people that breed years. I just do not. Sorry to upset you. But I thought thats what you were asking.
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 206.130.170.11
Posted on Wednesday, September 03, 2003 - 02:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Trisha- It is not the original topic but as the discussion is valid I would like to add my two cents. We do not have to think of horses as people to be concerned about their welfare. Why do mare owners wait so long to breed their mares? As a stallion owner I would not consider accepting a 20 year old mare. I will not breed a maiden mare over 12 or any mare over 15 years old. Horses are considered to be senior at 15+ years. There are many, many good younger broodmares and many good years available to breed any mare.
No, horse pregnancies are not like a women's but they are still risky and stressful. As their caretakers why should we risk a mare's health or (possibly) life? My name is Kellyann Mulholland, I am a Vet Tech and Animal Services Officer.I've been breeding horses about for 15 years and been an Animal Welfare Officer for 20 years. I breed mares with foals at foot every year but never on the "foal heat". I would prefer as the stallion owner to keep a mare for 16 days to check for pregnancy but its not always possible. Do I lose lose business because of my policies? Probably, but I'd rather lose business than lose a mare or foal.
Good Luck
 

Trisha
Posted From: 209.187.120.129
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2003 - 11:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Kellyann. I completely respect your decision as a stallion owner. I knew well the risks of breeding my mare, and almost didn't do it. I bought her at 16, a rescue in my eyes, severely underweight, rain rot all over. I couldn't let her stay where she was. Over the next year, she blossomed into a beautiful healthy mare. We competed a little, and she always did well, no one believed me when I told them she was 17, including the vets who did her prebreeding. I just kept hearing she had the uterus of a 10 year old. I decided that I really wanted my next show horse to be her foal. I got 2 different vet opinions on her before I bred her, as I wanted to be certain she was healthy enough for it, especially considering her unknown past. I started breeding her at 18, had one questionable conception, and one early loss. I chose another, younger, different type of mare to breed for the next year since I had a LFG. It fell through at the last minute, so I gave my mare one last shot. She conceived on the first breeding, and the rest is history, I have a lovely 5 mo filly now. As I said before, I had no intention of breeding her again, as she has been such a wonderful friend and companion for me, I want her last years to be good ones, however my sister is very attached to this mare, and looking for her next show horse, so she will have just one more. I have consulted vets again, and seek help here on this board as often as I can. I know it is not ideal, and if I were a stud owner, I would probably question breeding an aged mare such as mine too. However, I respect, and I feel you do also, a horse owners right to breed their mare, assuming they are making informed decisions. I was fortunate for my mare to have an easy, uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery the first time. I have my fingers crossed for one more.
Good luck also with your business. I am sure it is well respected and well run. I hope for many healthy foals in your future.
Trisha
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 206.130.170.11
Posted on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - 02:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Trisha, no one knows their mare like the owner. Good luck with your mare, I will want one of my stallion's offspring one day too, fortunately I have frozen semen to work with!



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