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Role of uterine cycts in pregnancy loss

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » Role of uterine cycts in pregnancy loss « Previous Next »

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Susan Robinson (128.172.71.60)
Posted on Friday, May 31, 2002 - 09:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Late last year (September) we AI'd my 18-year old paso fino mare. The vet (young and inexperienced) ultrasounded her and said she was pregnant. We put her on Regumate to be safe (and her prosterone tested very low). When another vet came out in February, he said she was no longer pregnant. We had her uterus biopsied and the results came back "1B." The vet recommended to go ahead and breed her again. We rebred her (AI) in early May. At 18 days the vet said she had so many cysts that he couldn't tell if she was pregnant. We now wonder if she was even pregnant last fall or if the other vet just saw a cyst. The vet came back the next week and saw a heartbeat. She's on Regumate again. My question is, could the cysts interfere with maintaining the pregnancy at this stage? I read that they may interfere with migration and implantation of the conceptus over the first 16 days, but at this stage of pregnancy, can they cause a problem?
 

Tracy (65.227.52.144)
Posted on Friday, May 31, 2002 - 12:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan, I don't know if this will help but it might make you feel better. Last June I bred my 16 year old maiden Arabian mare. When the vet came out he thought he saw a pregnancy (15 days) but not sure since she had multiple cysts in her uterus. We put her on Regumate for 10 days and then rechecked. My vet saw a cyst that was a little larger but no heartbeat and her uterus was soft. He said no pregnancy and told me to not waste anymore money because it was going to take a miracle to get this mare pregnant. Well, two weeks later she still had not gone back into heat (this was a mare that was very obvious!) so the vet came back out. Guess what! She was pregnant!! Her due date is actually today and I am now awaiting my miracle foal :) If you want to go back and read the old posts, I wrote last year about this mare under "multiple uterine cysts". So good luck and let us know.
 

Kelly (63.172.47.182)
Posted on Friday, May 31, 2002 - 12:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had a 20 year old Arabian mare sent to me for breeding. She had so many cysts that it looked like clusters of grapes in there. I put her on immune boosting supplements and bred her. Because of the size and number of cysts, she had to be close to 30 days to confirm a pregancy.

She is pregnant, and upon ultra sounding, was found to have less cysts than she did last year. The problem is that the pregnancy is in the body of the uterus. There was not much available space for implantation elsewhere. It is not likely that she will retain this pregnancy.
 

corry_dvm (208.180.96.165)
Posted on Sunday, June 02, 2002 - 11:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Uterine cysts (large ones) can interfere with the conceptus' ability to attach to the uterine wall and get enough nutrition to survive. It depends on the size of the cysts and how many there are. I personally got a 19 year old mare with numerous uterine cysts pregnant and then again two years later. It can be done, but there is the possibility of early fetal resorption. And don't degrade the "young inexperienced" vet too much--even the old pros can confuse a cyst with a pregnancy--they can look the same!!
 

Horse Pro (24.191.220.222)
Posted on Thursday, June 06, 2002 - 05:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

According to Dr. Steve Slusher, DVM, MS. Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine, (retired). Uterine cysts which are typically located at or near the bifurcation of the uterine horns are not so much a hindrance to conception as they are an indication of a problem with the uterus itself, which can be very difficult to accurately identify.

They can cause problems for veterinarians with some of the older ultrasound machines trying to differentiate between a vesicle in the 12 to 18-day post ovulation window. They as was stated will occasionally, albeit rarely interfere with a vesicle’s ability to attach to a viable location at or near the bifurcation, which is where the majority of conception attachments occur. Typically mares that possess a fair number of these uterine cysts, which conceive then carry to term will have significantly fewer or none at all upon post parturition examination. All the more reason to watch these mares closely. Thoroughly examine and document everything about them. Carefully kept detailed documentation will very often provide the key to solving these mare’s problems. In other words, according to Dr. Slusher “ find what’s causing the mares to have the cysts, treat that problem and the cysts will no longer be a problem". As was also stated the situation often responds well to immuno-stimulants which would lead one to believe that they for the most part are the result of a compromised immune system.

HP
 

Sara Patrick (216.78.59.83)
Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2002 - 07:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This board has been very informative for me, as well as encouraging, thank you. I have a 18 year old mare who has had 2 fillies over the past few years, but in recent years, I've bred her to a fertile stallion and she wouldn't conceive or was absorbed before the tests were done. Anyway, I had a vet recently give her an ultrasound, and he showed me the cysts in her uterus, and I wanted a colt out of her, anyway, what are these stimulants you were talking about, and where can I get them... thanks Sara
 

Horse Pro (24.189.241.20)
Posted on Saturday, August 17, 2002 - 07:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sara the most commonly used immuno stimulant is a product called Eq-Stim. It is available through your veterinarian and is fairly expensive at ~ $20. per cc. I’m certainly not suggesting that this will be the silver bullet that will solve your mare’s problem but it surely can help along with a good nutrition program that includes a source of free choice, correctly balanced horse minerals (NOT that red trace mineral salt block) that everyone seems to think is an adequate source of minerals.

HP



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