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How young is too young to breed?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » How young is too young to breed? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Beck (209.240.224.226)
Posted on Saturday, June 02, 2001 - 10:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a filly (TB/Dutch) who will be 3 next May and am thinking about breeding her then. (She would foal when just turning 4.) Is this too young? Do I need to consider any extra nutrional needs to both support her growth and the growth of a fetus? Any/all input is appreciated - Thanks!
 

Corry Christoff-Wilson, DVM (64.199.3.32)
Posted on Tuesday, June 05, 2001 - 10:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If the filly is a combination of these breeds, I would wait. The filly may not be finished growing and a pregnancy would certainly be a strain (nutritionally and physically) on a filly that young. Why is it necessary to breed her so young? Let her grow up first. She is stilll a baby herself.
 

warmbloodBreeder (152.163.201.193)
Posted on Friday, June 15, 2001 - 10:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It is not rare to breed one as young as 3. I think you would be fine to pursue breeding her at that age. Warmbloods, like the one you mentioned do tend to grow till there like 5 yrs of age, so she still has growing to do, but thousands of Warmblood breeders start breeding thier horses at age 3 because they can't ride them till they are 4 or 5 and they will get a foal or two out of the mare before they break her. I see NO reason why you could not breed your mare, If you still feel unsure, ask your veternarian, more in likely he will say it depends on the mare and your decision. But if you are worried it may harm her or stunt her growth, that is highly unlikely. It may take a little exrta effort to get her in foal due to her young age, but from my own expereince, you should be fine, I am a breeder of of a stock of over 50 Warmbloods, all which have successful foals being bred at age 3. GOOD LUCK!!
 

Kelly (63.172.47.209)
Posted on Friday, June 15, 2001 - 02:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I understand that many Warmbloods are successfully bred at a young age. Still, you must ask yourself why delay riding and training, and not breeding? The answer is simple, because their bodies are not fully prepared.

The mares body will leach supplies of calcium etc., from its own body for the growing foal. The problems that may be experienced might not neccessarily be seen by the human eye ( stunted growth ). It is better to wait until the mare is completely developed herself. This is not to say that breeding as that age can not be done, it can, it is just not the best case senario.
 

warmbloodbreeder (152.163.201.187)
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 10:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am sorry to write again. But SO many people OVER exagerate when it comes to breeding TOO early. That is not true. In RARE cases it will stunt the growth or harm the mare. But I have raised over a 100 head of foals, and half of that herd the mothers were bred at age 3 !!! I bet if you ask your vet he will say it would be just fine.
 

warmbloodbreeder (152.163.201.187)
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 10:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Miniatures are bred at age 2.
 

Kelly (63.172.47.201)
Posted on Monday, June 18, 2001 - 10:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The best senario is to wait until age 4 as a rule. There are many mares that are bred at age 3. Miniatures, of course are not ridden, so are a moot point. This is not an exaggeration, just a cautionary statement.

If the mare has been well taken care of as a younger animal, she may well be strong and mature. Not all people are responsible in regard to the feeding and care of yearlings,etc. My point is, unless you have raised the mare yourself, or know what kind of care she has recieved, it can be less than an ideal situation. You do not want to be mounted on a horse with less than adequate bone density. It can happen. Of course, common sense plays a role here. If you know the horse and how it was raised and cared for, you have a better understanding on which to make your decision. As a GENERAL rule of thumb, 4 is better.
 

WARMBLOODBREEDER (152.163.201.182)
Posted on Sunday, June 24, 2001 - 10:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

PONIES ARE BRED AT 2 AND YOU RIDE THEM!!! BEING THAT I HAVE RAISED HUNDREDS OF FOALS, I HAVE NEVER HAD A PROBLEM BREEDING ONE AS YOUNG AS 3. THERE IS NO GENERAL RULE OF THUMB WHEN IT COMES TO HOW YOUNG YOU BREED THEM. BOTTOM LINE IS, IF SHE IS MATURE ENOUGH INTERNALLY NOT PHYSICALLY ON THE OUTSIDE TO CARRY A FOAL THEN SHE WILL BE FINE!!! THE ONLY ONE TO ANSWER THAT QUESTION WOULD BE YOUR VET. I BET A MILLION DOLLARS THAT YOU WILL HAVE A HEALTHY FOAL AND A HEALTHY 3 YR OLD MOTHER. ASK ME SINCE I HAVE DONE IT HUNDREDS OF TIMES BEFORE! GOOD LUCK!
 

Kelly (63.172.47.201)
Posted on Sunday, June 24, 2001 - 01:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Danielle- A prominate cutting horse trainer,whom I know personally, had a bad experience because of this very subject. He had purchased a nice and well trained 6 year old. All went well until she sustained a leg fracture. It was discovered that she had been bred at 2 and foaled at 3 years of age. Xrays and tests showed that she had not developed a strong skeletal frame due to the probable lack of calcium that her body needed, but gave to the foal.

Your personal opinion and experiences are revelant and important. It is however, also important to realize that every situation should be considered carefully and on an individual basis.

Not all horses are acceptable to breed at age 3, and not all horses are not. A vet can only make a decision based on the information at hand. Without knowledge of the care and background of the horse in question, no one can give an absolute answer to this topic. My point is to beware and be careful in making a decision such as this. Surely you don't see anything wrong with people being informed of the pros and cons of any subject, no matter what your experience has been. I am sure that you have taken in to consideration all of the above and have had great results.
 

Beck (209.240.224.226)
Posted on Monday, July 02, 2001 - 10:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry I started an argument -- But I believe it is quite different to breed a 2-year old to foal at 3 rather than a 3 year old to foal at 4.
Thanks for the input about considering the history of the horse. I've raised this filly and the place I board has supported my endeavors with her -- they raise Paints and are very concientious about nutrition for the weanlings on up as well as for the moms - so this is a plus.
My reasoning to breed her is that she's quite full of herself -- and I'd like to give her an extra year to mature mentally and have often heard that having a foal can settle a mare nicely.
But I wanted other breeder's opinions on the physical aspect especially in regards to warmbloods. (The farm owners have occassionally bred their 3-year old paints - but they're definitely stock horse types.) My only experience breeding was when I bred this filly's mother -- thanks for all your input -- my next stop is to call my vet and find a stallion for next spring! :)
 

Kelly (63.172.47.204)
Posted on Monday, July 02, 2001 - 10:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Beck- To the contrary, this was a good question. You do know about the history of this filly, and have made an informed decision.

I absolutely agree with you, to breed any horse at age 2 is definitely a folly.

Good luck and I hope that you find just the right stallion! Thanks for the forum topic.
 

warmbloodbreeder (64.12.102.54)
Posted on Saturday, July 21, 2001 - 09:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good Luck Beck with your mare. I just wanted to add that five of my 3 year old mares (just turned 4 this year) just had 5 healthy foals this past month!!! 3 fillies and 2 colts.!! I have 4 others due in a week of so. So far mom and foals are great! AND MIGHT I ADD MATURE AND HEALTHY!!
 

BarnTroll (64.209.134.135)
Posted on Wednesday, July 25, 2001 - 10:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Danielle, I know that some people are breeders of miniature horses, and they are certainly not meant for anything specific, other than being a pet. Some experts would consider them mutants. They generally have more problems foaling than horses, and can not be ridden. Personally, I think that they are cute. But according to your ideals, they have no reason for living. Maybe you are right.
 

Danielle Atencio (207.173.228.96)
Posted on Friday, May 31, 2002 - 10:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi

I have a three-year-old quarterhorse filly that is going very well in reining, I plan on showing her well into old age, but lately I have been cosidering breeding her. I heard that sometimes when you breed a young reining horse it causes their pelvic bone to tilt too much and it can ruin them...Does anyone know if this is true? I am only seventeen years old, and I have never raised a foal. My aunt raises Quarterhorses, and she said that she thought that it would be fine to breed her this year, but I wanted to get several more opinions on the matter before I make a final decision. If you can help me to better understand the changes a mare's body goes through during pregnacy, please do!!! Thanks a million!
Danielle Atencio at: gonnabearanch@citlink.net



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