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HELP!!!!!!!! Dangerous Situation

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » HELP!!!!!!!! Dangerous Situation « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Horseluver
Posted on Monday, May 07, 2001 - 06:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My friend knows nothing about horses!!! She has a 16 yr old grade mare. She plans to breed to a draft/pony stud two days from now!! She thinks she knows what she's doing, but she dosen't. Her mare has serious Navicular Syndrome. Plus, she also has low fetlocks and bad hocks. This mare had had no BSE, they claim she is sound, but 1 look at her, you can tell she should be retired. This mare is ridden hard too. They gallop her at least 3 times a week. Its truly a weird situation. PLAESE help me out. I cant convice the girl otherwise.
Thanx,
Horseluver
 

Jos
Posted on Thursday, May 10, 2001 - 04:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You would be well advised to talk to a local equine veterinarian who may be able to assist in evaluating the mare and explaining some things to your friend.

Good luck.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Saturday, May 12, 2001 - 01:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have an eight year old quarter horse mare who becomes extremely cantankerous on the ground and while being ridden during her cyles. During these few days, she paws, whinnys for her buddy every few minutes, tries to prance on the lead line, will buck if you do anything other than walk and trot...etc. For having quite a bit of thouroughbred in her, she is quite level headed most of the time and does not normally exhibit this behavior and her ground manners are usually very good She is only ridden once or twice per week. I'd love to work with her but at this time I cannot.

She would make a fine breeding mare as she is truly.However at this time I have nowhere to keep a foal.

I am considering some type of hormonal therapy so she will be ridable say at a show or just a quiet ride. I also considered over the counter pastes used for calming but doubt if this would yield much of a noticable affect. Do you have any ideas from past experience to offer.
 

Corry Christoff-Wilson, DVM (64.199.2.26)
Posted on Wednesday, June 06, 2001 - 10:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

These mares often benefit from oral (or injectable if you can find it) Progesterone therapy. Regumate is the trade name used most. It is daily and expensive, but can be very effective.
 

Goldie (198.81.17.153)
Posted on Wednesday, June 13, 2001 - 10:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We have a similar situation as Anonymous above. Our 11 yr. old morab mare puts her ears back, gives attitude, and may give an occasional mild buck during her cycle. We were told by a friend that she may respond to hormone treatment, as described above, OR having her bred may mellow her out. If that is true, would it mellow her only during pregnancy and after pregnancy would she return to her PMS self, or would it have a "settling affect"? Any studies on this? Is 11 yrs. old an appropriate age for a maiden mare to be bred? We also heard that she may be difficult to breed, if she has these cycle hormone type problems--does anyone know if that is true? We would want to move her to a barn where the people knew alot about foaling, as we are novices. What kind of expenses would we be looking at? Any other advice?
 

Kelly (63.172.47.181)
Posted on Wednesday, June 13, 2001 - 02:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Generally, eleven is not too old to start breeding. It depends on her condition and that can be determined by a veterinarian during a breeding soundness exam.

Many mare that behave as yours does, do tend to "mellow" during and after foaling. It all depends on the individual. Some return to their cranky old selves after foaling. For the most part, they do improve. It is not a "cure" for this type of behavior. If there is any physical problems that may be responsible for her actions, ultrasound and blood work may be of benefit.

You would incur the cost of the prebreeding exams, any stallion breeding fees, vet costs involved for pregnancy check and misc. vaccinations. The mare will require additional booster shots at 5, 7, and 9 months ( Rhino flu). She will need to be on a good worming schedule and additional supplements. The foal will need a check up at birth, and additional feed at about 2-3 months of age.

Providing that all goes smoothly, this will be a 16 month commitment until the foal is weaned. Then the care cost double, because you now have 2 horses! It can be a wonderful experience, but is not without its added responsibilities, costs and possible problems.
 

susan (198.26.123.38)
Posted on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 09:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a young mare that was bread when I got her. She is due in late Feb. I have never had a pregnant mare before and I am not sure how to feed her in the last few months. I don't want her to gain too much weight, but I don't want to stunt the growth of the baby either. Please give me some advise.
Thanks
 

Ivy Rittenhouse (152.6.24.71)
Posted on Thursday, December 20, 2001 - 12:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan:

Might I suggest that you buy the book, "The Complete Book of Foaling" by Karen E. N. Hayes, D.V.M., M.S. ISBN 0-87605-951-5, Howell Book House. It is a very informative book, it will tell you how much and when to increase your mares feed. Also, what to expect during a normal delivery, and what to do if the mare is in trouble (dystocia). I read this book, and others like it, every foaling season.

By the 8th month, I slowly increase my mares' feed and hay amounts: I have "generally" followed the guidlines described in this book with great success. Up until the 8th month, my mares get only 10% feed. At 8 months, I increase the protien to 12.5% and increase the amount to 0.5% body weight + 1/2 lb per day.
At 9 months, 0.5% body wight + 1 lb per day.
At 10 months, 0.5% + 1.5 lbs per day.
At 11 months, 0.5% + 2 lbs per day.
*Of course, you have to increase gradually over a few days.
Hay: Free choice.

After day 320, I give warm bran mashes once a day, and continue until 5-7 days post foaling.

Not all horses are the same. If you have a horse that is hard to keep weight on, I put corn oil in the feed.

I hope this helps some. ijr
 

Stephen Dettweiler (65.115.192.234)
Posted on Friday, December 21, 2001 - 08:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 18 going to be 19 in May year old Mare. Grand Daughter of Doc Bar and Great Grand daughter of Six Chick. From what we can determine she has never been breed. She is cycling well and shows herself to be very receptive. Some poeple have told me that it's no problem to breed her and other have said if her hips have set in a certian way do to the fact that she has not had a foal yet that it would be to dangerous to breed her. Would like some more advise.

Doc's Royal Chick
 

Trisha (209.245.110.254)
Posted on Thursday, January 03, 2002 - 12:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Have you had her biopsied and cultured? I have a TB mare, 18 going on 19. She was biopsied a 2A, lsat year, and had an early loss. My vet checked her out thoroughly, and said everything seemed to be normal hormonally, uterus, etc, but I may just have to be persistent with her. My best advice is to make sure you have her thoroughly checked out, as a mare with a lower grade uterus will be watched differently during the breeding process (retaining fluid, etc). Best luck to you!
Trisha



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