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Breeding a sway backed mare

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » Breeding a sway backed mare « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Amy K
Posted on Monday, March 19, 2001 - 01:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is sway backed a genetic disorder that would leave reason to not breed the mare? Is it passed on?

Do sway backed mares show the normal signs of being pregnant like other normal backed mares would?

I am asking for a friend of mine.
 

Jos
Posted on Wednesday, March 21, 2001 - 12:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Conformation is a heritable trait - either good or bad - therefore a sway back can indeed be inherited although whether or not it will be will depend upon the genetic make-up of the animals involved.

Reliable pregnancy signs are not generally related to conformation, so in that respect there would be little difference between a non-sway back and a sway back mare. Rectal palpation, ultrasound and (under some circumstances) blood analysis are the most reliable methods. External observation may or may not be reliable depending upon stage of pregnancy, position of the foal and expertise level of the observer. Having said that, I will certainly concur that a sway-backed mare may carry a foal more "lowly slung" than a non-sway backed maiden mare would, for example.
 

Amy K
Posted on Wednesday, March 21, 2001 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ok, on to the next question and thanks for answering me. This mare is bred, she was live cover with a stallion that has a long back. Anyway, bad choice in my opinion. She was due last week of February this year. She has not changed in appearance, has produced no milk, her rear looks normal, no jelly like feel. I don't think she is pregnant. She is trotitng and bucking and I would think if she was pregnant she would be too uncomfortable to be doing that sort of thing. The owner only had her checked at 21 days after breeding, she was in foal then, then she came into heat 2 months after breeding then the vet just a bump test on her at 9 months and said she was pregnant, although the mare never gain any weight and kept teasing my gelding. And she was feed just oats, red cell supplement and coastal and got her 5-7-9 shots. Can this mare really be pregnant and being maiden does that mean she wouldn't have to gain weight or her udders not fill with milk or even wax up, etc.

Thanks in advance
 

Jos
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2001 - 01:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Maiden mares will often carry the foal higher and may not produce milk until foaling or even shortly after. If you have any doubts, you should have her checked again by a vet. It is not uncommon for mares to go longer than the anticipated 340 days!

Make sure that your hay has no fescue in it as that will also cause the symptoms you are suggesting ("late" foal; no udder or milk) - talk to your vet about that and the use of Domperidone.

Good luck!



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