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Uterine ligament hematoma (sp?)

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 1 » Uterine ligament hematoma (sp?) « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

K. Sulz
Posted on Monday, January 15, 2001 - 01:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I thought I would enquire here as to if anyone has had any experience with this. I had a mare that was diagnosed with a uterine ligament hematoma last year about 5 weeks after foaling. She was collicking and quit eating and passing manure. She almost didn't make it but we hung in and she started to improve. No outside bleeding but a mass apparent when palpated. This mare was already back in foal when this started about 5 weeks after foaling, and since reabsorbed the foal last fall. I am glad she did as she lost a lot of weight and I was worried about her ability to carry another foal. She has wintered well and seems healthy. I am going to get her checked by my vet, and talk to other vets about her, but my question is - if I breed her again this year ( smaller stallion), will this jeapordize her life? Has this hematoma weakened her uterus so that she may have a greater chance of problems next year? If anyone has had any experience with this, please share your thoughts. She is a lovely mare that I would like to see more foals from but don't want to kill her in the process. She is 13 yrs. old. Thanks.
 

Horse Pro
Posted on Monday, January 15, 2001 - 09:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This has no effect on the uterus it's self. However the integrity of the wall of the uterine artery has probably been compromised, and once compromised they never regain their original structural integrity. If this is the case then in all probability she would be in danger of this happening again and that could possibly be disastrous the second time around. What happens in some mares is the walls of the uterine artery loose their elasticity over time and when the high blood pressures that giving birth cause, are reached. They perforate and start to leak into the surrounding structure. They quite literally bleed to death internally, in only one case have I seen any blood outside the mare. Out of a total of 11 cases that I have personally dealt with, only two survived and that was only after extraordinary measures were taken very quickly. The two mares that did survive almost died from secondary problems.

It sounds like this mare may have dodged a bullet this time. I can only speak from personal experience here and I am not a veterinarian. If this mare were mine I would not consider breeding her again. Watching a mare bleed to death and all the while knowing that there is little or nothing that can be done, is not something that I recommend.

HP
 

Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2001 - 12:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

In cases of uterine artery rupture would the mares bleed into the abdomen or would they exsanguinate through the uterus?
Would like some feedback on this please
 

Horse Pro
Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2001 - 07:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I can only speak from my experiences in this area. Of those that I have dealt with, only one actually showed any blood externally. When this happens it is never a very pleasant experience for all involved, but when they also bleed through the vaginal opening it is all the worse. I liken it to trying to stop a flood. This condition BTW is very painful for the mare, they thrash wildly and get up and down and tend to run about the stall. In the futile attempt to try and protect the mare from hurting herself. One can easily be in a position of serious danger of harm themselves. I have in these instances had to try and place an indwelling catheter and start a whole blood transfusion. Unfortunately this usually is of no benefit because of all the pain involved. The mares blood pressure goes up and the bleeding actually increases. Coagulation drugs do not work in these cases because the artery is not torn or cut, but looks more like a piece of gauze with the blood leaking through. In essence that artery has lost it's wall integrity and begins to seep blood rather than a laceration where the blood gushes out. When examined on necropsy, the area of the artery that is compromised can be as small as the end of your finger or as large as your finger is long and just as wide. It actually looks very much like a small garden hose that has been repeatedly kinked and stretched.

The only cases that I have been involved with where the mare was saved, were cases where we pretty much accepted the fact that she was going to die any way. So we made one last ditch effort. That being an IV injection of formulin. (This is NOT something that I or any practitioner will recommend.) However in both cases the horse was saved. It subsequentially took a very long time for the mares to return to reasonably normal health. Also in both cases the mares were never bred again. I'm not exactly sure what the formulin injection did other than drastically lower the blood pressure, but the mares did survive.

HP
 

Anonymous (203.29.244.81)
Posted on Thursday, August 02, 2001 - 03:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

what is the drug chorolon used for in the mares cycle?
 

Cathy French (198.142.187.48)
Posted on Sunday, June 09, 2002 - 10:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What is chorolon used for in mares? Doing a uni assignment and needing this information. All help would be welcome.



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