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Aggressive 3yr old stallion

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Stallion Questions » Aggressive 3yr old stallion « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

elizabeth cavin
Neonate
Username: Dreamer

Post Number: 1
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 04, 2006 - 03:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 3 yr old saddlebred colt in training with me right now that is really giving me a run for my money. He is a terrible biter he also has learned to stand on his hind feet and strike at you. He will also pull the lead out of your hand and run off with it in his mouth. To me it seems like everything is a game to him. But he has become very dangerous. I have only had him in training for 2 weeks and any advice anyone could give me would be great. I also broke and trained his sire who at 2 yrs old was just as rotten but has became a wonderful stallion that I have been riding and standing at stud for 4 years now.
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 200
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 04, 2006 - 10:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Wow,
Sounds like you have a lot of horse on your hands. While I don't have any specific training recommendations, other than a "no tolerance policy"...which you are probably starting to impliment.
If he is just plain "rotten" and unschooled (never been taught anything), he should certainly improve quickly when the rules are applied. However, I wouldn't personally care HOW well-bred and talented a stallion was....if he has an aggressive personality and continues to be a danger to handle....I'm a big fan of gelding. Had a friend pawed in the head, landing her in the hospital by a rank stallion years ago. So, I tend to geld and ask questions later!
Best of luck (and be careful),
Heather
ps. for the biting...get yourself a gove and push thumbtacks through to the outside over the bridge of the hand. Wear it on your right hand and let him bump that a few times...with all hope, he'll get the message.
 

Megan A Brown
Yearling
Username: Fabmeg

Post Number: 77
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, May 05, 2006 - 12:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My granddad would say take that colt out to a soft sandy spot and tie up a hind foot when you are messing with him. Let him fall down a couple of times and he'll realize the rear and strike game isn't any fun. He can fight with himself or be nice to you. When he stands like a good horse, let him have his foot back. Run a stud chain on him so you can make it uncomfortable when he goes to pull away. It also sounds to me like he has a lot of energy. If you have a hot walker hang him on that for a hour or so first thing in the morning, then work with him. For a horse that dangerous, you need to find a way to take the edge off and keep you safe.
 

elizabeth cavin
Neonate
Username: Dreamer

Post Number: 3
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Friday, May 05, 2006 - 04:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

dear heather and megan thank you both for your info I have been training horses for many years and have to say he is one of the first to be this bad Iam really hoping it all comes together for him soon and no one gets hurt mainly me LOL.
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 203
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, May 05, 2006 - 09:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Elizabeth,
It always seems that there is "that one" horse that is so talented...and then always some kind of glitch. Hopefully, this one you have can be persuaded to behave otherwise.
Had a mare years ago that was freakishly beautiful and talented. However, she was horrible...aggressive...hateful for that matter, with little disregard for people. In her case, I was at a complete loss...and so was she. Too dangerous.
So, coming from someone who knows where your at with this one...I wish you the best. Let us know how things go, ok?
 

elizabeth cavin
Neonate
Username: Dreamer

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 - 07:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey guys just an update on the colt. he did really well today I think there is hope for him yet. He is really starting to remind me of his sire and that makes me think he will come around. We are still having the biting issue but the rearing has started to come to a halt. Any more advice would be very welcome on my part and I will be sure to keep ya all posted
Thanks
Elizabeth
 

Sachiko
Neonate
Username: T_ontheleftcheek

Post Number: 3
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 14, 2006 - 12:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have had only one horse this bad when it came to bitting. We did every thing we could think of and we had to get a shock collar to get him to stop. I never wanted to go that far with any horse but it was him or me.
 

elizabeth cavin
Neonate
Username: Dreamer

Post Number: 5
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2006 - 06:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree I have used a shock collar on several horss for many different reasons I am firm believer in making a horse mind I am not one that is real big on getting hurt. Any bad habits are unexceptable and need to be broken as soon as possiable
 

elizabeth cavin
Neonate
Username: Dreamer

Post Number: 6
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 05:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey guys just a quick update on the colt he is doing wonderfully. I think I have figured him out he seems to love his work and is not half as rotten as he was in the begining. He seems to be very very smart and learns very quickly. I just hope he keeps going on the road he is on. And thanks again for all your advice. I will keep everyone posted on his progress.
 

Megan A Brown
Breeding Stock
Username: Fabmeg

Post Number: 126
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 01:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It is always the smart ones who are total jerks untill they figure work can be fun! Thats the problrm with most of my broodmares, They are too smart for their own good!
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 197
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Saturday, January 20, 2007 - 01:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Im having a bit of trouble with getting my colt to respect my space. He is a yearling, wont be two until near the end of March.
Hes getting bold, touching his shoulder into me when I go to get his water pail, or backing his butt up to the gate when I want to go in, or tilting his head sideways and trying to lip my hand when I go to unlock his paddock door. Hes turning into a royal little fart these days. My trainer, who he goes back to this March 1st, tells me not to let him away with any of that kind of behavior, and I have been using my small whip (not hitting him, but showing him) and he sure knows what that is all about. He will back up when I tell him to, his ears flattened down of course, but he has never tried to kick me or do anything more agressive than I have described. He has never bit or attempted to do anything more than give me a lip now and then, but I sure don't want to let him get away with that. I don't think I need to entertain the thumbtack in the glove trick as hes not a biter, but if anyone has any tips as to how to get him to be more respectful of my space when I am in his stall, I would be interested to know what worked for them, and what didnt.
 

destiny berwick
Weanling
Username: Destiny_berwick

Post Number: 50
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 20, 2007 - 02:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

debbie do you plan to geld him? dont worry its typical to colts not wanting to respect your space, i had the same problem with mine. the best thing to do is keep your cool but be assertive at the same time, if you make a big deal of it he will get what he wanted. just have fun with him and good luck, ps if you really dont have any breeding plans for him, i would get him gelded you will enjoy him more, GOOD LUCK!
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 198
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Saturday, January 20, 2007 - 05:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Destiny: I plan to use him for a stud. He is a triple homozygous tobiano. Homo for paint gene, homo for creme and homo for black. He is rare up here in Canada, and the only one I know of with that genetic make up. He is a grandson of QT Poco Streke, a World Champ Reining Paint Horse, so I am hoping for a good stud book on him next year. I have attached a head shot of him so you know what I am talking about. He is Perlino in color, which is a diluted buckskin, and being homozygous for creme, he will dilute all foals so chestnuts could be palominos, bays to buckskin, black to smokey black, etc.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y4/canadianhorselady/woodysho8x10edited2Small.j pg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y4/canadianhorselady/1595BurnettBanner1Small-1. jpg

These pictures were both taken last summer. He was 16 months old at the time. He won 16 ribbons in his first two shows as a yearliing, 4 Reserve Grand Champion ribbons, 5 first place, and 7 seconds. He also won Halter Stallion of the Year trophies as well as Yearling Longe Line and In Hand Trail. I think he would make a good stud prospect.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y4/canadianhorselady/trophiesSmall.jpg
 

destiny berwick
Yearling
Username: Destiny_berwick

Post Number: 53
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Sunday, January 21, 2007 - 06:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i totally understand that you want to keep him a stud man hes pretty. ive never seen a perlino paint before. well maybee just maore training will fix his butt, or maybee he needs more of a job. when our colt wasent respecting our space, after we broke him and he had somthing to do he starting to give us more respect. im gussing that your colt is a halter horse? do you plan to break him or after your done showing just stud him out. sometimes they just ge a little bored i hope it all works out!
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 199
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - 09:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Destiny: Hes rare being a perlino (diluted bucksin) and also homozygous for paint, creme and black. Probably why you havent seen one before.

Hes going back to the trainer in March. My bay paint mare is due to foal around the middle of March and we are going away to florida... so I wanted to be sure they are both taken care of while I am away. My mare will foal there and stay for a month or so, and Woody will be broken and start getting ready for this years shows - all of which are on saddle.

We did put a saddle on him last July and he didnt care at all. I even took a picture of him in the round ring with the saddle on and he just stood there.... so Im hoping that hes just as easy to get started under saddle this spring, though hes grown an attitude this winter and I think the trainer might have a job in front of her :P

Here are a few pictures from last summer's shows.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y4/canadianhorselady/1506BurnettOvertheBridgeSm all.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y4/canadianhorselady/1212BurnettSmall.jpg

and after the show, we put a saddle on him just to see what he would do....

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y4/canadianhorselady/debwoody30-07Small.jpg

I think hes just bored... hes by himself in his own paddock and his own big run in stall that is 12 x 20. It would be nice if he had some company, but I would be afraid he would get himself hurt. He nickers to my mare, who is pastured within his eyesight, but she doesnt give him the time of day. Come March, he will be busy with the trainer, so hopefully he will settle down and get to work.
 

destiny berwick
Yearling
Username: Destiny_berwick

Post Number: 62
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - 05:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

hes pretty nice photos, how old is he now and in the picture how old is he. hes really pretty good luck
 

Megan A Brown
Breeding Stock
Username: Fabmeg

Post Number: 194
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - 07:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It's hard to give show horse studs friends. My I suggest a goat? They make great horse pets. My teasing stud is too little to live with the geldings so he gets a goat buddy. The goats aren't nearly as into him as he is to them, but it gives him something to do. If the "lippyness" is bothering you, one thing that works well on my lippy colts it to grab their lips and hold them in a light lip twitch. They get their teeth looked at all the time so grabbing a lip doesn't come a shock; it just isn't something they consider much fun. Most of them figure out pretty quickly that if they want to annoy me, I'm going to annoy them right back. It's my favorite solution to the problem because I can grab a lip any time any where and there isn't a whole lot they can do about it. Sometimes if it surprises them they will try to pull back, but if they understand the concept of a lip twitch and you have strong fingers it usually works. I've even done it on my big stud a time or two when he forgets the rules about lipping my coat.
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 200
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Thursday, January 25, 2007 - 09:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Destiny:

He will be 2 on March 23rd. He was 16 months old when these pictures were taken last July.

As for the goat suggestion, I think I'll pass on that one :-) We have a few classic cars around including a 68 camero and corvette, and my little convertible 72 bug... I can just see where that goat would be standing some morning I went out to feed the horses haha. Anyway, he goes back to the trainer at the beginning of March. Once hes there, she will keep him busy and he wont have time to get bored. Hopefully she wil be able to work the attitude out before the show season starts.

Deb
 

Teena Bain
Nursing Foal
Username: Bluejay

Post Number: 20
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 27, 2007 - 01:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a yearling colt like that. He likes to be in control and that stall is a small space to be in. I tie mine up (chain attached to steel beam) when I mess with him in the stall (grooming, blanketing etc.). He stands like a nice young man.. When he is in hand he gets my elbow in his shoulder when he crowds me. He moves away. When he puts his face on me I just push it away.. This works with mine. I have an older stallion as well. He is always tied when I brush and blanket etc. This works very well for me..
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 203
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Monday, February 05, 2007 - 08:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My guy is a little better behaved this week than last. I have no idea why though. I havent really changed anything since showing him the little whip my trainer gave me to remind him of consequences. My hubby thinks hes like a puppy and doesnt like to correct him, which I remind him that no puppy is going to be 16 hands high, and when he decides to jump on his head he may wish he was a puppy and not a full grown PITA.

His newest trick is to lip my hubby's coat sleeve and hold on while hes working in his stall. He doesnt bite, just walks along with my hubby holding either his coat sleeve or bottom of his coat like a child holding your hand. My hubby thinks its funny, I think he needs a boot, actually they both need a boot.

When I go into the stall he sometimes flattens his ears, sometimes he doesnt. Sometimes he wants to be scratched, sometimes he turns his butt to me like hes saying, "get closer baby and I'll send ya to the moon", or "i'm ignoring you today", He has never tried to kick me, though I havent presented him with a target to do so either.

I havent blanketed him this winter, even though the temperatures here in Canada have been really cold. Same with brushing. With the moods he has been in I have been reluctant to do more than give him a good scratching now and then and get outta there before he squishes me against his stall wall etc.

Im sure its just a confidence thing, as my hubby isnt the least bit put off by him, though hes 6'4 and 250 pounds in his own right.

Maybe I'll have to start tying him up and working more with him before he goes back to the trainer in March. I would like to start brushing him again too as we both used to enjoy that activity last summer and fall.

I think part of the problem is that we don't have our barn up yet. The horses are in individual paddocks with a huge outside run in each, which keeps them out of the wind and weather. I don't have any electricity out there, so its not a really inviting place to try to do any work with the horses once the sun starts to go down or when the weather is cold or windy as it has been the last month or so.

Deb.
 

Teena Bain
Weanling
Username: Bluejay

Post Number: 22
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, February 05, 2007 - 11:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I truly believe horses need to know what to expect from their humans… When mine are tied they know there is no monkey business… It’s like they take on a whole different personality.. It does make a difference having a sturdy safe place to do this.. Has to be solid.. Maybe you can make an area at your place undercover that you can pull him out, tie him up and do your grooming and blanketing?

You are right about the colt needing a boot.. He is in control and he is going to hurt someone… I know some things seem cute. But, remember how big this animal is. He does not know that humans are not the same size and strength as he his. Horses that get away with this will play with a human like they would another horse. You know what that means? Biting, kicking, striking and stomping. I would work on those manners and respect. He will be happier when he knows the boundaries.

I am no expert.. I have been breeding and raising horses for many years.. I would not allow this and there would be severe consequences for any animal that behaved like that.. What I mean by this is, you have like 3 to 6 seconds to correct them. Has to be immediate and effective. And, I do not mean chasing him around trying to whack him with the crop. He would only have a ball doing that.. He needs to be in halter and under your control whenever you are in his space.. Shank works very well also.. That is one of my favorite tools.. Does not take much from me to tell them to stop what they are doing.. If they do not change the behavior I can ask again with a little more pressure.
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 206
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 07, 2007 - 06:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think that I should be tying him. I have thought about it but I am not home during the day so I cannot leave him tied up for any amount of time.

I put his halter on yesterday with no problems. He actually put his own head right into it and stood there while I did up the snap. I also cross tied him in the run in and brushed him for about half an hour. He seemed to enjoy that, though it was so darn cold by the time that half hour was up, I couldnt feel my fingers any more. Im praying for warmer weather but will continue tying and brushing and especially tying him when I am in his stall.

Deb.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Neonate
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 8
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 06:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When it comes to gaining respect a horse is never to old or young for the basics. Ground training is were its all at. You don't even need to be able to get near a horse to start gaining his respect in the round pen. Just get him in there and start working him. Clinton Anderson with down under horsemanship has some wonderful round penning videos available. The basic concept is to make it easy to be nice and hard to be disrespectful. Start by lunging him no line no halter needed when he's nice back off him a bit when he breaks stride or disrespects you get on him some. You can advance quite far this way without using a halter or line.
I also agree with Megans granddaughter be sure to use a cotton rope (25ft is good) and I do it in a round pen. I always refered to it as scotching a horse up. You need to be careful doing this tho because you can get tangled in the rope or kicked. I tie a bolo knot around the neck and then loosley run the rope around a hind foot then back throu the rope at the neck. Slowly take up the slack. when you get the foot up or "taken away from him" you can secure it with a couple of half hitches. Always keep hold of the loose end of the rope. This is not for the faint of heart as he will fight but as long as you have the rope you got the control. When he finally gives and is submissive to you release him. He should stay down till you tell him its ok to get up.
This is not mean or abusive if done correctly. It will not break the spirit of a horse and involves no hitting or yelling. If you do this do it calmly.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Neonate
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 9
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 06:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Megans granddad not grand daughter sorry!!!!!!!
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 220
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 05:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was out running errands today and came home to a new injury on my stud colt. He had some blood spatter on his leg and when I noticed that, I looked at him. He was sucking at his lower lip. I could see a ring of blood on his lip and a tooth hanging down from his top teeth. I thought.. what now!!!!

Anyway, here is what he did. Warning.... this picture is NOT for the queasy.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y4/canadianhorselady/woodytoothSmall.jpg

So off I trot to the house, call the vet. Vet calls me back (of course she is at home ) KA-CHING goes my horse expense warning bell.

Vet comes out, brings her assistant ooohhh another KA-CHING.... sedates him... KA-CHING....pulls the tooth, stitches him up... KA-CHING....tetnus shot, anitbiotics..
Well, you get the idea... The vet was due to come out on Wednesday this coming week to give my preggo mare her boosters before she foals next month.. guess I'll be signing my paycheque directly over to the vet this month.

Deb.
 

Elise Krueger
Weanling
Username: Elise

Post Number: 42
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 07:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Deb, I had a gelding do something similar about 15 years ago. He was running down the fence, slammed on the breaks, did a roll back into the
fence and his it upp teeth on a corner post...geesh. It took part of his upper palat (sp) as well. Vet did the same thing (althoug cheaper then)....he never missed a feeding. It hurt me to look at it, bit didn't bother him at all. Never grew back two of the upper right front, but grazed just fine....so go figure. Good luck with him....
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 221
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 17, 2007 - 07:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

He Elise:

The vet said it was a baby tooth. Woody is not yet 2, so hopefully he will grow another one in this one's place. I guess we will see.

I hope it doesnt hurt his show season this year with halter classes etc, but theres not much I can do about it at this point.

The vet put his winter blanket on since the sedative has a tendancy to lower blood pressure and make them colder, so for now hes blanketed and sulking in his stall. I had to take his hay out and delay his afternoon feed until dark just to be sure that he was over the sedative. He was in a foul mood when I went to feed him this evening. OH well.. big baby,, maybe he learned his lesson and wont do whatever he did again.

I have no idea how he injured himself. He was in his stall and theres nothing in there he could really hurt himself on.

ANyway, I looked at it later and its not too bad now that its all stitched up and the tooth is gone. I am sure he will be sore for a few days. Ill check him again in the morning and make sure he hasnt torn out the stitches etc.

Deb
 

Jenni Luttrell
Nursing Foal
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 12
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 04:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

He may have injured himself being bored and cantankorous in his stall. Make sure he has something to play with in there with him when left for more than a couple of hours. I hope he heals well and fast. Good Luck!!!!
ps. Its been my experience that horses, exspecially stallions, tend to develope fowl attitudes when stalled without enough hands on handling and turn out time.
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 225
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 07:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Jenni:

His stall is in a nice big pasture so hes got lots of room to run and buck and play. He has a stall ball and a big chunk of log to toss around as well. I can open the gate of his stall right into his paddock, so he can walk in and out of his stall as he pleases. The stall itself is one big bay in an 8 bay pole shed. His stall measures 12 x 24, so hes got lots of room in there out of the wind and weather as well. His turn out area is about 300 feet by 100 feet.

I think you are right about the hands on stuff. I do brush him alot and spent an hour with him in his stall while waiting for the vet to come stitch him up. He also had a nice tree to beat up in his paddock and hes spent a good amount of time trying to eat it !. He may be bored as I work off the farm and my husband is busy off the main house so hes not seeing alot of people coming and going.

He is off to the trainer the beginning of March, so this is all coming to an end soon anyway. He will stay at the trainer through the show season and then home for winter again, then come spring hes off to a stallion station to train to collect for AI, so I doubt he will have time to be bored once he leaves here in a couple of weeks. For now, we are keeping an eye on him and trying to keep him from hurting himself again. I've got a blanket on him off and on these days to start him shedding out as the weather is starting to warm up from the -34 winds we were getting a week or so ago. He loves to twirl around and see if he can catch his blanket in his teeth, so that has also given him a new activity... sheesh... its like horsey daycare.

Oh, and lastly, hes got Becky a few bays down from him to talk to, although at 315 days preggo, shes a bit stuck up lately and only talks when theres a food bucket coming her way. Her paddock goes out the opposite way from Woody's so they don't get to rub noses, which is probably a good idea since she would probably boot him a good one given the opportunity given her late term of pregnancy and general fed-upness with this whole adventure in motherhood.

Deb.
 

destiny berwick
Yearling
Username: Destiny_berwick

Post Number: 84
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 09:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

deb ohh what a big boo boo lol. is he going to be able to have a bit when he gets older... i hpe he recovers good!!! fingers crossed
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 227
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 10:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Destiny: I sent the picture to his trainer. She almost flipped.. i belive she said.. the friggin little idiot!!! in the subject line LOL.

anyway, the vet pulled the tooth, stitched him up and hes good as new. You cant even tell now that he did anything other than hes missing that baby tooth. The vet says his adult tooth will grow in, so hes lucky in that respect. He's eating normally and behaving since this happened, so everyone keep their fingers crossed until he goes to the trainer March 1st !!!!

Deb
 

Lori Coleman
Weanling
Username: Editorlady

Post Number: 43
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 - 11:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Debbie,
My (very pregnant) mare has long had a habit of biting at her chest when agitated. This winter, she did so while wearing a heavy-duty Rambo blanket in our MN cold weather and tore her bottom gum at that gap between the front and back teeth on the buckle. It was gaping and icky but the vet couldn't sew it, so she healed on her own with just some bute for pain relief. It is completely healed now, without so much as even a scar, although it was only about a month ago. Will have no problems with a bit or anything. Mouth injuries look really bad, but seem to heal wonderfully.
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 228
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 - 09:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The vet was out again yesterday to do Becky's last shots before foaling and also gave Woody his second shot of antibiotics. His mouth looks great. It has healed up so fast I am amazed. I emailed my trainer tonight to come pick up the little turd. A week early, but at least at her place she can start to work him and keep him busy and keep an eye on him, which we cant with working off the farm. Hopefully we can keep him injury free through this show season and maybe she can adjust his attitude by keeping him busy.

Deb.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Weanling
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 27
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 12:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

HI DEBBIE,
SOUNDS LIKE HE'S GOT A REAL NICE PLACE TO PLAY THERE. I SO ENJOY WATCHING THEM "ENTERTAIN" THEMSELVES THEY COME UP WITH SOME PRETTY KOOL TRICKS. I GLAD HE'S HEALING QUICKLY FOR YOU NOTHING WORSE THAN WATCHING OUR BABIES HURT. HE'LL DO BETTER AT THE TRAINER WHERE HE IS BEING STIMULATED BY LEARNING.
I HAD A YOUNG COLT BASH HIS HEAD INTO A FENCE POST PLAYING ONE DAY IT WAS TERRIBLE LAID HIS FOREHEAD WIDE OPEN. HE HEALED WELL THO, WAS JUST A LITTLE MORE CATIOUS OF WHERE HE WAS JUMPING AFTERWARDS. LOL HAPPY FOALING TO!!!
GOOD LUCK
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 244
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 07:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Jenni:

Woody went to the trainer yesterday. He will be there for the season and possibly I will board him there year round where he has more horses to chat with and less chance of boredom and injury. Becky, my broodmare also went yesterday as she was 315 days in foal. She will foal out there too.

Deb
 

Jenni Luttrell
Weanling
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 32
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 01:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

One good thing about him being easily bored as these are usually the most talented and intelagent ones. We just have to stay on our toes so we dont get more'n one step behind them lol best wishes



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