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Natural Stallion Management

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Stallion Questions » Natural Stallion Management « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Lauren Dixon
Neonate
Username: Mestena

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 05, 2006 - 02:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Greetings from Montana,

I am in the start-up phase of my first breeding business. I will be focusing on rare, cold blooded breeds in my program, mainly Gypsy Cobs and Norwegian Fjords. Currently, I am drawing up plans for my property lay out (I just bought a new place), as all the old fencing here needs to be torn down and replaced, and the pastures are arranged in a terrible way. My question is this: Is there anyone here that practices, or can someone point me toward some articles or books about, natural stallion management? I have spoken to a few people briefly that run successful breeding operations utilizing a natural herd environment, either with mares, or with other males (not sure whether they were studs or geldings), and own very happy, easy to handle stallions. One woman took an unmanageable stallion on the verge of euthanization, and within a few weeks of being turned out in a herd environment, his whole attitude changed and he became calm, content, and tractible. I've known many stallions that spent their days locked in 12'x12' stalls in isolation, and became so terrifyingly aggressive that nobody wanted to clean their stalls or handle them. I know that isolating a horse is one of the worst things you can do to them mentally, emotionally, and physically, and I definitely don't want to deal with pent up testosterone on top of a social or emotional perversion caused by close confinement. Any suggestions for property/fencing lay out and natural management techniques? I need all the advice I can get...

Thank you,
-Lauren D.
North Central Montana
 

Cathy
Breeding Stock
Username: Cathy

Post Number: 108
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 08, 2006 - 12:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lauren are you in the Conrad area or close? I know someone there that may be able to help you. Cathy
 

Lauren Dixon
Neonate
Username: Mestena

Post Number: 4
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 09, 2006 - 09:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cathy,

Yes, I am relatively close to Conrad...About 80 miles or so I think...

-Lauren
 

Cathy
Breeding Stock
Username: Cathy

Post Number: 109
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, March 10, 2006 - 07:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lauren this is Johns website. It has his phone # as well as his email. He loves talking horses and I think he could help you out with the questions you have.

http://www.sunshinehorse.com/index.html

BTW my stallions grew up with and live with geldings. They are very happy well adjusted boys who are a pleasure to handle and be around.

(Message edited by Cathy on March 10, 2006)
 

Lauren Dixon
Neonate
Username: Mestena

Post Number: 5
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 - 06:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you very much, Cathy. I will check out John's website and see if he has any advice to offer.

-Lauren
 

beth freeman
Neonate
Username: Biffawaffa

Post Number: 8
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 10:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

when is a good time to start breeding a colt?
 

Lori
Nursing Foal
Username: Shstables

Post Number: 11
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 - 09:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I too want to have a natural stallion environment. Thanks for the site suggestion.

Beth - I think it differs from colt to colt. We held off on breeding our clyde stallion until he was going well under saddle and in hand. I wanted him to be able to forget 50% of what he knew in the excitement of breeding and still be under my control. Since my guy is so big, 17.2 1800lbs and growing, I felt that was necessary. I think it has made for a better stallion in my case.
Mine is 6yrs. He is probably on the older side for starting in the breeding shed. It would also depend on what you want to do with your stallion. If breeding is his only job then that would make a huge difference!
 

Sachiko
Neonate
Username: T_ontheleftcheek

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 14, 2006 - 12:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 4yr stallion that has that also grew up around geldings and mares. But now he has gotten very nasty to my gelding. He never had been before. I am woundering if it is just big boy horse play or if he really means to hurt him. I would love for them to be together all the time but dont want to get my Gelding hurt.
 

Faye Gallagher
Neonate
Username: Cazdan_arabians

Post Number: 1
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 14, 2006 - 06:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

For how long has the stallion been paddocked with the gelding? Is there a mare, new mare in the adjoining paddock/property. How much time are you spending with the stallion as opposed to the gelding. There may be many other environmental factors affecting his behaviour. Can you elaborate?
Faye
 

Lori
Nursing Foal
Username: Shstables

Post Number: 19
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 10:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We decided to pasture our stallion with our mares. At least the mares he had already bred.
He gets on with the geldings but I am worried because he is so darned big in comparison. So right now he is out with "his" mares. It was a long introduction process but I really believe this natural approach will help make a better more socailly adjusted stallion.
 

lisa murray
Neonate
Username: Lmurray

Post Number: 3
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 09:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Are stallions ok with foals if they have bred the mare (dam of said foal)
 

Megan A Brown
Breeding Stock
Username: Fabmeg

Post Number: 122
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My Stud loves all babies, his and others. He gets excited when the mares and colts come in for breeding obviously but after the cover he is always clam and gentle so we let him nuzzle on his girlfriend a little or visit with the baby. Last week the little filly gave him a good solid kick when he was in the way of where she wanted to nurse; he looked quite shocked, but didnít go after her. My mares came off a ranch where the pasture breed so they all grew up with their daddies.



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