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Fencing for colt, requirements for stallion

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Stallion Questions » Fencing for colt, requirements for stallion « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 115
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Friday, January 27, 2006 - 11:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I just bought my first stud colt. He is 9 months old and 13' so far. His sire was 16' and dam was 15'2 I am figuring on a 15+ hands high stallion when hes done growing. I am going to be fencing the pasture for his new home. He is used to pagewire and barbwire from his home in Indiana and has never been on electric. He has already jumped out of the round pen we have been keeping him in as the electric fence at the boarding facility is poor and grounds out frequently.

My question is: How high do I need to build this fence so that he wont outgrow it? What kind of electric and how many strands etc??

My mares are out on electric, one strand and wont go near it, but this fellow, well hes a horse of a different color :-)

Deb
 

Terry O.
Nursing Foal
Username: Ksfarmer

Post Number: 15
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Friday, January 27, 2006 - 02:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Put a hotter fencer on that what the previous people used if you use electric. Line his round pen with electric wire about a 1 1/2' to 2' from the outside pen. This will let him learn what the wire is and it will make him think differently about his safe jumping distance and height. Once he learns what the electric fence is he will respect it. I doubt if he will jump the one wire after he has learned what it's all about.
 

Jenn
Yearling
Username: Jenn

Post Number: 67
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, January 27, 2006 - 02:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Debbbie, is the ground frozen and/or snow on the ground where you are? If so, it is very difficult to get electric fence to work properly. Terry is right about him respecting it once he knows what electric fencing is, but teaching him may be difficult this time of year. Is there another horse you could keep near him when he is in the round pen?
If your ground is frozen/snow covered he will leard about electric fencing in the spring, unfortunately that doesn't help much right now. Also, would it be possible to put a sting of barbed wire across the top to discourage him since he is already used to barbed?
 

Jenn
Yearling
Username: Jenn

Post Number: 68
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, January 27, 2006 - 02:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry, I just reread your post Debbie. Since your boy is being kept at a boarding stable, the barbed wire is probably not an option.
 

Emma
Breeding Stock
Username: Emma

Post Number: 122
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Saturday, January 28, 2006 - 07:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a six foot fence around my stallion. He doesn't need it but i think it is law here, he also has a double fence on the border of the property and it is hot wire at head level. He is not a problem with fences but i would rather be safe than sorry. We have a lot of people ride past here and i would hate for him to go hurtling over a fence and catch a piggy back on a passer by. Six foot fence should stop him jumping it, my stallion is a adult 15.1 QH (cremello) and he doesn't even look at the fences. Good luck
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 117
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Saturday, January 28, 2006 - 08:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Guys:

Yep its winter here. I live in Canada. We have about two feet of snow and the temperatures are ranging between 20 below and 0, so its really up and down. THe boarding facility is using electric tape and combination of wire, which works great for my other horses, who grew up on electric, but this guy, her new hannovarian colt and another one like to walk through the wire, or over it, or under it :-)

I am concerned he is learning NOT to respect fencing at all. I cant change the fencing as it isnt my property, but plan to put up a very high fence here at home this spring before I bring my horses home. I just want to be sure I put up the right stuff and the right height. There is page wire and barb wire at the roadside of this facility, but the babies arent in that turnout area. He has alot of buddies in with him (four others) so he just wanders under or through the fence to the other side and hangs around the fresh bales of hay waiting to go into the paddocks. Little Fart!. ANyway, will see if we can give him a few shockers today and get him to respect these new fences.
 

J.R.Hamilton
Weanling
Username: Cobbreeder

Post Number: 39
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Sunday, January 29, 2006 - 11:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Use baby oil and oil very lightly his , neck ,chest and face and sides and butt.. great conductor for electricity and helps make they hot wire savy.
Some will never become so, but most if they get zapped enough try their best to stay away from getting repeated zapps
 

Jenn
Yearling
Username: Jenn

Post Number: 70
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, January 29, 2006 - 12:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Debbie, how did yesterdays efforts go? JR's idea of oil might work, but if you choose to try it remember that in cold weather being oily is way colder than being wet.
 

Jenn
Yearling
Username: Jenn

Post Number: 71
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, January 29, 2006 - 02:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Debbie it is just me again. I may have an answer for your current dilema, but I warn you this will probably be a long post.

Your problem sounds like your fence isn't grounding properly though the horse because of snowy frozen ground. (from now on for clarity when I say "ground" I mean electric ground, when I say "earth" I mean the ground you stand on)
Normally electric fences just use the earth to act as the electric ground, but that doesn't work when frozen/snowy (or really dry).

What can be done is you can run another wire below the hot(electrified) wire to act as a grounding wire. When a horse touches the hot wire and the ground wire they will get a zap.

Start the wire at a grounding rod (the fencer unit should be connected to one) run it along the fence near the hot wire (apx 6 inches would be good, if they are too close the wires could touch and short out the system. But it has to be close enough that the horse can touch them both at once) DO NOT CONNECT THE GROUND WIRE TO THE HOT WIRE. The ground wire doesn't need insulators, it can be stapled directly to the post. It can be any wire (electric tape, electric string, smooth wire, etc) as long as it conducts electricity. Another hot wire can be run along the other side of the ground wire if necessary. This can also be left as a permanant addition and then you have an all year functional electric fence.

I hope this is clear and might help you. Good luck.
 

J.R.Hamilton
Weanling
Username: Cobbreeder

Post Number: 40
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Monday, January 30, 2006 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I wasn't suggesting you soak the poor colt in oil . Just put some very lightly on your hands to touch the ends of the winter hair in areas that would come in contact with fence...
 

Jenn
Yearling
Username: Jenn

Post Number: 75
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 31, 2006 - 12:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Debbie, I hope you have had some success in keeping you new guy fenced in.
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 119
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Friday, February 03, 2006 - 04:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Guys. I tried the baby oil trick, It worked ok until he wouldnt let me near him with the bottle haha...Just kidding... as long as the fencing is working, that seemed to the trick. The facility strung some new wire as well and we are doing our best to keep it from grounding out. Its freezing rain and raining here today and yesterday, so the horses arent out to see if the new wire does the job. Its hard to do anything when you don't own the facility where the horses are. We are planning to get our own fencing up at home as soon as the frost is out of the ground and we can get the fencing guy in to fence a nice 100 x 250 paddock for the little monster. I have requested 5' high fencing with electric around the top. Hopefully that will keep the little houdini in during the day. Who knew this little fartling would be such a pain. My other horse grew up on electric and we have one little strand running around her pasture. She never goes near it and neither does her filly. This fellow, however, walks through it like nothing and walks around the yard.
 

beth freeman
Neonate
Username: Biffawaffa

Post Number: 6
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 04, 2006 - 06:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi debbie, i also have a stud colt and he is also a hand full. We did a high tensile fence with a electric tape around the top so he could see where the fence was, we also have a 2.9j solar hot box(with a batt back up) he touched it twice that i know of and has respected it since....good luck
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 120
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 09:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

thanks beth. We are currently working to get the fencing problem solved with the boarding facility. The weather, combined with freezing rain one day and windy freezing temps the next is making things more difficult. Hopefully we will resolve it all soon and get the current running consistently to keep him from testing the fence.
 

Dorthy (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 136.181.195.113
Posted on Friday, February 10, 2006 - 02:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a question along these lines. For a stud that will be exercised/ridden/lunged 3X + a week how big of a paddock do you think would be appropriate for a stallion. we may be taking one in and need to fence in an area for him and I am just not sure how small is too small. I don't have a ton of area and I do not want him in full time with my mares--do not need too many babies at once
Opinions are appreciated:-)
 

howard couvillon
Neonate
Username: Hmc1956

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, February 13, 2006 - 01:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I just recently purchased my first Foundation Quarter stud horse. He is 14.1 Hands High and 1200#. I built a pipe paddock for him that is 66' by 88' & is 6 feet high. I made the paddock this size because of the amount of pipe I had on hand. The top rail is pipe and another pipe rail around 3' with slick wire strung and turn buckled to keep tight every 6". He has not showed any interest in attempting to get out, not that I think he could unless he jumped it. If that happened instead of a cow horse I would be inclined to change his education to a different direction.
 

Dorthy (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 136.181.195.113
Posted on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 - 01:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The area we are looking at fencing in is 50 X 76 and we will also be puttin gup a 6ft high fence. Another question how much space between his paddock and the mares pasture should there be...........If they are too close will he get upset, etc??
 

beth freeman
Neonate
Username: Biffawaffa

Post Number: 7
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 07:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i have a 2yr old stud colt and he's right next to all my mare's...at first he was throwing a fit but now he dont care at all but he will talk alittle but no running around or bucking anymore...(it took a day of showing off to them)...just make sure ur fence is nice and hot! he's only in a 5ft high fence
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 125
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 11:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just another thought about putting the stallion beside the mares... make sure you don;t use pagewire. stallions and mares will paw at eachother, either could put a hoof or leg through the pagewire and be seriously injured. My fencing guy has recommended a 5 or 6' electric fence, wires at 1 foot increments.

Deb
 

Jenn Van Horsen
Weanling
Username: Jennuwynn

Post Number: 21
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 04:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would invest in a solar fencer from Princess Auto, I got one two years ago and LOVE it - just nail it to the fence outside his paddock and hook it up by itself. Then I'd stick an extra WIDE visible band at the top, and in the middle of the fence, if you can get the kind of insulators that stick out so that he doesn't get right up to or on the fence before he gets 'corrected'
I know my small welsh pony stud knows that he can just run into the electric and snap it, if he really wanted to get out he would if I didn't make sure the fence was visible, at least two strand and the band/wire didn't sit in the paddock instead of right on the fence.

As far as how you do it at your own home, if he is jumping rather than smashing through, I'd use a taller system but still, with 2 strands of electric - I cannot in any case say that barbed wire would be a choice I would make ... it may deter him but also injure him, so I'd say that is counterproductive.

I used softwood rails for my fencing, and use 2 strands of electric fence using a solar fencer. I only put one really good ground post in, it's in the ground about 4 feet deep and attched with a good wire (I used the insulated type you can bury) and my fencer will still give a zap even though the wire or bands are grounded out in numerous places.

Good Luck, Jenn :-)
 

Dorthy (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 136.181.195.113
Posted on Friday, February 17, 2006 - 12:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks..........
I would no way use barbed wire and for now are using 6 foot wood posts with horse wire fencing(like field fence but the spaces are smaller) if needed we will put a strand of electric at the top. We are putting about a 6 ft space between the studs paddock and the mares pasture if it doesn't seem to be enough I will relook at that. The mares pasture is just done with T-posts(with toppers on them) and electric tape so moving it won't be too big of an issue
 

Jennifer Demski
Weanling
Username: Jennifer_d

Post Number: 28
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 18, 2006 - 12:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just wanted to say to Dorthy, I too have T-Posts with tape fencing and love it! I have the T-Post sleeves instead of toppers, but it is so easy to work with and I have never had an issue (knock on wood) with the horses disrespecting it. They do however, know when it is NOT on and will sniff at it. Stinkers. Guess that's what I get for letting them graze in my backyard when we are home to babysit! It's ALLWAYS greener on the other side.
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 318
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 18, 2006 - 01:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

For us we have gone to the route of wooden fence. The chances of a horse going through it is slim to none ... it looks to them that they don't want to through it. We have in our smaller lots with horses nosing each other put a strand of electric at the second board and then at the bottom board. Keeps there heads in from trying to go over the top and keeps there head in at the bottom from trying to get the grass on the other side (although they do keep the grass short and helps from having to trim ! , but the electic stops them from this). I do have a couple of lots that we threw up that has woven wire, and again two hot wires on it and that keeps the mares in and they are happy .
 

Dorthy (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 136.181.195.113
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 01:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

the T-posts are really nice if it ever has to be moved etc....and yes my horses are respect the electric tape and even when its off they have not tried to get out--wouldn't trust a stud though!! We decided to go with the wood posts and field fence for the stud because of cost--would like to do all wood eventually but the field fence will hold him better than just electric tape I think
 

Jayme Bizoso
Neonate
Username: Ravenhawk

Post Number: 9
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Saturday, February 25, 2006 - 03:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How about another 2 cents...I have a 3 year old cheval canadien stud. He is in a pasture with 4 foot field fencing (it was here when I moved here...I would have chosen 5 foot horse wire), and two strands of hot wire above wire fence. I have mostly t-posts. He hates the hot wire and absolutely respects it. There is one area where his pasture borders the mare pasture. I put in a 12 foot wide runway inbetween, made out of 4 strands of hotwire about 1 foot apart held by t posts. He chews on the white tape, but not on the blue wire, when the power is off, but does not go through. I will put up wire fencing as soon as the weather permits and I have $ as I do not trust him. I read a study that horses do not see colors easily except for blue or blue/green. I tried some blue green hot wire from Jeffers and all of my horses seem to see it better and seem to really stay away from it...better than from the white tape I have. My boy does not chew on it or even approach it, and I have touched it and it really snaps you. Anyway, I really like it and will do the rest of pastures in it as I can. I also noticed that my boy seemed to really settle down when I put a llama and 2 goats in his pasture. The goat eat all the yucky weeds and the llama keeps the predators out. They are easy to keep and cheap to feed, so it worked out great. The stallion and llama play all of the time and he seems much more calm. I can take the mares out of their stalls, tie them a few feet from the stallion and he comes over and talks, but does not go crazy like he used to. Hope some of this is helpful.
 

Danielle Roosen-Runge
Nursing Foal
Username: Rolling_hills_quarter_horses

Post Number: 12
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 25, 2006 - 05:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have to say hey neighbor! Have you collected Mark since school? Cash is doing really well... foals are coming in about 2 weeks!
 

SDS
Nursing Foal
Username: Whisper05

Post Number: 16
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 19, 2006 - 10:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I use metal corral panels for my stallion,he is 15hds,if he gets excited he will bump them but he cant jump them,I can move them around also which is nice and I use 3 strands of smooth wire,black electric tape on top and 2 strands of reg hotwire as my pasture fencing.I havent had any problems with this combo,my foals learn real quick to respect the fencing and my mares will stay in with baling string if necessary.The stallion even respects my fence as well as my young colt.But if I had my way I would have a 6 foot wooden fence with a hotwire on the inside and 1 on top.
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 133
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Monday, April 24, 2006 - 02:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

we finally managed to get my little bratling to respect the fencing. The trainer put a chain through his halter and let it swing about 4 inches down one side. The first time he went to test the fence, he got a major shock that set him back a step. Undeterred, he did it a few more times before he got the idea that he was going to get a good zap every time he tried to escape ! He did try to crawl out under the fencing on his knees but ended up breaking one of the fence posts with his hind end on the way out. Since then, the trainer has put another strand of wire and also replaced the broken fence post and added one on a diagonal as well.

In the past month he hasnt bothered with the fence, phew.

At home we are putting in 4 rail vinyl horse fence along the front of the property, with 6 foot high fencing with a combination of steel wire alternated with white cord (also electrified) up to 6 feet. That should keep the little bratling in when he comes home as well.

I could wind toilet paper around my mares paddock and she would never test it, but unfortunately, this colt spent 4 months boarding at a place where the fencing just wasnt adequate. Hopefully he wont try to get out when he comes here from the trainer.
 

Hope Parr
Nursing Foal
Username: Hope26us

Post Number: 14
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 14, 2006 - 03:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Debbie
He kinda sounds like my guys.
I have a 2 yr old stallion that I have been raising since he was a weanling, a 4 yr old 16.2 hand stallion and a 4 yr old gelding.

the boys always seem to want to jump the round pen when working them so I dont work them in the round pen any more, I use a long line instead. as for the fence, they dont bother it. I have electric tape around the top. I have the white vinyl horse fence also. But thats all I have and its worked fine.

Hope
www.avalanchefriesians.com
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 134
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Monday, May 15, 2006 - 10:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I finally got my fencing all up. I put up 4 rail vinyl across the front of the property with 4 strands of electric on the inside, starting 15 inches from the ground and going up 15 intervals. The sides and back of the paddocks are all cedar posts with the 4 strands of electric, two of electric cord and two of heavy duty electric wire alternated from top to bottom. Everyone who sees it thinks im keeping giraffes :-) But I know what he can do with fencing. The fence guy assures me that once we get him home he wont go anywhere near it after he gets a good zap, so we will see !!!



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