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Is this stallion's quality good enough for breeding?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Stallion Questions » Is this stallion's quality good enough for breeding? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Esther Johnson
Weanling
Username: Estherj92

Post Number: 25
Registered: 03-2009
Posted on Thursday, July 09, 2009 - 08:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Some people I know own this young pony stud colt, and are thinking to use him for breeding purposes. As far as I know he is not registered, but they think he could sire some nice offspring. Do any of you have any opinions on his confirmation and/or the advisability of using him as a breeding stallion? He is two or three years old now and they have already tried to breed him to an Arabian mare. I'm just wondering what you guys think...thanks.
http://www2.snapfish.com/slideshow/AlbumID=954068022/PictureID=25073295022/a=749 802022_749802022
http://www2.snapfish.com/slideshow/AlbumID=954068022/PictureID=25080847022/a=749 802022_749802022
 

Nicole
Weanling
Username: Nicole

Post Number: 24
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Thursday, July 09, 2009 - 09:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Personally as a MO I won't breed to an unregistered stallion. But I know some people do :-)
 

Diana Gilger
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 2459
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Thursday, July 09, 2009 - 09:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Those are really hard shots to judge conformation on. Typically, strait side, rear and front shots are easiest to judge by. As a breeder, I will not breed unregistered horses, as the current market just isn't good enough to sell them. People know nowadays that they can get some pretty great deals on registered foals with outstanding pedigrees. Foals that were bred to win at racing, jumping, showing, reining, whatever...If your friend is looking at this from a money making point of view, I'd have to say no. As his foals (especially since he's young and not an accomplished stallion) will not bring much more than pet prices at this point. Had he been an unregistered stallion with great natural talent in one area or another, and had outstanding temperament, it might be different. I have owned registered mares that I bred (long ago) to an unregistered stallion without hesitation...but he was a reining champion, a barrel racer, a roper, and pretty much a great all around stallion. He put some fantastic babies on the ground that nobody could complain about....and their sale value was amazing.
 

Terry Waechter P.R.E. foals
Breeding Stock
Username: Watchman

Post Number: 818
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, July 10, 2009 - 12:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

not to rain on your parade...but even if you want a foal for yourself, try to find a registered stallion because the foal can live for 20+ years and it is impossible to guarantee the entire future of a foal...sorry....the good news is because of the economy she might find a discounted breeding to a registered stallion... good luck
 

Ann
Yearling
Username: Northernperch

Post Number: 84
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Friday, July 10, 2009 - 07:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would weigh in and say that I probably would not breed to an unregistered stallion either.

I can;t add much more then Diana because she pretty much said it all and said it well.

Good luck withwhatever you decide to do.
 

Esther Johnson
Weanling
Username: Estherj92

Post Number: 26
Registered: 03-2009
Posted on Friday, July 10, 2009 - 09:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you for all the advice...as it happens I am definitely not considering, and probably never would consider breeding to an unregistered stallion. I was just looking for more opinions on the situation. As a general rule then, the safest thing would be to geld grade colts that don't show remarkable promise...? Thanks again for all the advice! :-)
 

Samantha
Breeding Stock
Username: Dressage_diva333

Post Number: 762
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, July 10, 2009 - 01:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree, you need registration papers. There's nothing about that colt that makes him exceptional. I geld purebred colts with excellent pedigrees that show quite a bit of promise. Only the finest of finest should be intact, and it's a hard life on stallions. Not all horses have the mentality to be a stallion.

I breed ponies (as well as Warmbloods), and all of my foals are registered (most double registered), and the market can be tough for even them. I think that the biggest market in breeding ponies is for Hunter ponies, they sell for $$$$. However, you do not want spots on those ponies, so regardless of the registration of your pony, I don't think he would be a very valued stallion. If you want to breed ponies, check out many of the Welsh stalions available. Fully papered, all offspring (even out on non-Welsh mares), can be registered either full are half Welsh with the WPSCA. He's a cute pony, and I'm sure would make a good little child's mount as a gelding :-)

Like Diana said, you need better pictures to evaluate conformation.
 

Nicole
Weanling
Username: Nicole

Post Number: 26
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Friday, July 10, 2009 - 01:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Esther YES it is always best to geld those who do not show exceptional promise and talent at a young age. A mediocre stallion will make an amazing gelding :-)
 

Carol
Yearling
Username: Rodawn

Post Number: 57
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Friday, July 10, 2009 - 05:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My thoughts exactly. There are even a large number of registered stallions who are performance tested and approved that I think should still be gelded. There are a considerable number of mares out there that should not be bred either.
 

Robin
Breeding Stock
Username: 1horselady

Post Number: 129
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Friday, July 10, 2009 - 06:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I personally love the saying
"Good Stallions make FANTASTIC Geldings"
 

Mary Greer
Breeding Stock
Username: Cowgirlup07

Post Number: 219
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Saturday, July 11, 2009 - 02:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

He is cute, But, as everyone is saying, not a wise move. I will not breed to a grade stallion or a grade mare without AT LEAST being able to get some sort of for instance Pinto registration. This would mean a registered mare or stallion would breed te grade mare or stallion. With the rules the PtHA has all colts that do not have registered parents MUST be gelding before they can get papers. I would still only do it if the grade horse is a proven performer. I have a grade mare that is a grand champion that I would love to breed but she is too old at 26. She wont take.
 

Mary Greer
Breeding Stock
Username: Cowgirlup07

Post Number: 220
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Saturday, July 11, 2009 - 02:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OH! I forgot to add. The people who live next door bred grade foal after grade foal for years (Not even good quality ones) all were inbred for awhile the son was breeding his dam and his sisters. They have changed their ways now and have a registered stud (Still shouldn't be bred as he is not high quality) but my point is they took a load of I think 6 foals last year to auction and the whole lot ALL TOGETHER brought a whopping 5 dollars! Plus they all went to the killers but 1 (He went to a child)
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 963
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, August 18, 2009 - 03:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

One more thought; something a very experienced person whom I respect very much, told me. She said that so many stallions live their lives in a small enclosure, rarely breeding. This could be because of a number of reasons. One could be that the are unregistered. There are few mare owners who will pay for a stud fee on an unregistered stallion. There are so many very nice, proven stallions out there.

What kind of life is that for a horse? Better to be gelded and live a normal life. Just food for thought.



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