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Tunnel visioned stallion not paying attention

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Stallion Questions » Tunnel visioned stallion not paying attention « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Cory Cape
Neonate
Username: 13forks

Post Number: 1
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2009 - 08:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

} I am having a problem breeding my stallion. I will give you a little bit of his background so you know what I am working with. He is a 9 year old quarter horse. I have owned him for a little over a year. The previous owner would either pasture breed him or hold the mares and let him breed them. I hand bred this horse last year and had a few problems but nothing like this year. You can catch him, walk him to the mare with no problems, but when you get to the mare he wants to rear up and basically "rape" the mare. Well when he rears you have no control over him. So my question is does anyone have any ideas or a solution to get this stallions mind a little more on the handler and to stop rearing?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2437
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, May 20, 2009 - 12:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Rearing can be one of the trickier problems to resolve. There are non-injurious ways to handle the problem (not flipping him over or anything like that, which is definitely contra-indicated), but it does take experienced handling to to it, and it needs to be don immediately. I would probably recommend taking him to someone that has that experience level, but ask around carefully before going somewhere - not everyone handles stallions well, and simply because they are "trainers" doesn't mean that they can (a) successfully train stallions; or (b) successfully train in a breeding situation.
 

Cory Cape
Neonate
Username: 13forks

Post Number: 2
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Friday, May 22, 2009 - 10:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah it is a tricky problem. I have a method that I am going to try out b/c there's not really anyone that I would feel comfortable taking him to and there's not a lot of people around me that breed. I have talked to people that have been in the breeding industry for 20 plus years that say its a VERY hard thing to break.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2445
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Friday, May 22, 2009 - 11:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There are two things that you might try if you are an experienced handler. They have to be done while the horse is in motion, not afterwards.
  1. If the horse is rearing towards something (e.g. a mare), than as he is in the air, step tot eh side, and bring him down to ground so that he is facing away from what it is that he's rearing to get closer to. After a couple of go-rounds on that, he'll start to appreciate the futility, and change his gameplan;
  2. If he is not rearing obviously to get towards something, then as he is in the air, send him away from you with the lead line by sending a loop up the lead line towards him. You don't want to pull on the lead line, as that will (a) pull him down on top of you; or (b) overbalance him and potentially cause injury. The sending him away from you is a form of punishment, and can be very effective. It's difficult to explain, and can be difficult to do if you're not experienced, but it is very effective when done correctly.
I do have to add that if you are not an experienced handler, you are more likely to get into a tricky/dangerous situation that cure it, so if that is the case, I once again urge you to seek assistance from someone experienced and who is a good handler.
 

Carol K
Nursing Foal
Username: Rodawn

Post Number: 17
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Friday, June 12, 2009 - 06:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A bit late to post, but Um, I would be very careful with instilling manners and respect issues whilst in the process of actually breeding. You have to manage the rearing by moving him away and teaching him to wait for the mare, but do it without him getting angry in which case you'd have a serious fight on your hands, and you'd lose that battle.

You're not going to get respect during breeding sessions, unless you can get some serious respect and manners training done for all handling/riding, so perhaps lots of extra ground training work is in order here. A lot of stallion owners use a special bridle with bit for breeding, but you have to be very good with your hands so his mouth doesn't get shanked by accident, which would be very painful and intolerably frustrating to the horse. The stallion does very quickly learn the differentiation between his riding bridle, standard halter and his breeding bridle. He will know when that special bridle comes on that he is breeding, but you should also be working his ground manners considerably with him wearing that breeding bridle (and not always heading to a mare with it) and develop a very strong foundation, upon which you can build the same "rules and principles" whilst breeding. Just because he's breeding doesn't mean he can forego any sort of manners, either towards people or to the mares! If he gets worse, you will find a lot of mares will start rejecting him because he's scaring them, which will increase his frustration.

Good luck.

(Message edited by rodawn on June 12, 2009)
 

Carol K
Nursing Foal
Username: Rodawn

Post Number: 18
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Friday, June 12, 2009 - 06:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

PS: Don't do any training unless you're very experienced with it and if you do take on the manners/respect training yourself, please ensure you have a person spotting for the first while in case he acts out in frustration and you get hit. Then you have some help and medical attention should it be necessary. He should NOT behave aggressively towards you, but you never know. The most dangerous time a person has with any horse, stallion or otherwise, is when they're learning your rules and they inevitably will try to push those boundaries to see if your line in the sand is really solid or not and whether you really are deserving to be the more dominant leader than he is.
 

bonnie stewart
Neonate
Username: Mr_stewart

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2009
Posted on Saturday, August 22, 2009 - 10:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

a nerve line will work on this problem
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2593
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Saturday, August 22, 2009 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Why on earth go straight to the extremes of a nerve line (which can - if used incorrectly kill a horse) when there are far better methods available?

While you want to teach the horse manners, you certainly don't want to teach him resentment or fear. That is completely counter-productive, and (especially) in a stallion can result in a serious attitude problem developing, and a dangerous situation just waiting in the offing.

We handle a huge number of stallions every year, and some of them are not particularly nice boys, but I have yet to need to use a nerve line on them, although I know how to, and have used one in other situations (although have never used one on a stallion yet).

Start basic and work up... using an atomic bomb when a fly swatter effectively kills the fly is seriously counter-productive...! :-)
 

Diana Gilger
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 2583
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Saturday, August 22, 2009 - 12:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i was just gonna say the same thing.....
(not that I've worked with tons of stallions, but that I thought the nerve line would be a tad extreme)

(Message edited by kdgilger on August 22, 2009)
 

Samantha
Breeding Stock
Username: Dressage_diva333

Post Number: 830
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Sunday, August 23, 2009 - 12:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Perhaps consider gelding.... there are too many ill mannered stallions, and EVERY stallion is capable of behaving like a cililized animal if the rules are explained to him clearly. A nerve line does sound way to intense.



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