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2 year old Biting Stallion

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Stallion Questions » 2 year old Biting Stallion « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Lee Ann Cornelison
Neonate
Username: Lacor54

Post Number: 1
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Sunday, July 03, 2005 - 11:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We have a 2 year old stallion that we are going to breed next year. When we try to do anything with him he is constantly trying to bite us. I know this is normal for a stallion but is there anything we can do to make it better? We were thinking about maybe putting a muzzle on him when we are working or grooming him. Any ideas?
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.150
Posted on Sunday, July 03, 2005 - 06:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Breath spray. Carry it with you at all times. Instead of fighting with him, spray him in the mouth or nose when he attempts to bite. He will give it up. Every one that works around him must carry it and use it the same way. If not, he may develop a "gamblers attitude" thinking that he can have his way the next time.
 

Deena
Breeding Stock
Username: Morganslil1

Post Number: 103
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, July 04, 2005 - 03:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lee Ann when he even thinks of biteing fuzz his nose and muzzle give him more attention than he really wants just rub his nose and muzzle til he cant take any more,and do not give him any treats by hand This is what has worked for my 2 year old stud.Deena
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.130
Posted on Monday, July 04, 2005 - 06:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am glad that Deena had success with the above method. However, I will stress that the best idea is to avoid all contact with the muzzle area.As Deena suggests, always place treats in a bucket before offering to your stallion.

Young stallions learn the much needed fighting skills by playful nipping and annoying each other. It would be best to not confuse this inate desire to play fight with your stallion. Corrections made around the muzzle could easily be confused with play fighting. No interaction is the best policy.
 

Deena
Breeding Stock
Username: Morganslil1

Post Number: 104
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, July 04, 2005 - 06:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tx It could be because Cowboy is really laid back an mellow (Grin) but what ever works biteing is one bad habit.Thanks for the tip on breath spray It may come in handy.I try to live and learn.Deena
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.130
Posted on Monday, July 04, 2005 - 06:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Deena- It really comes in handy in public. I always feel like someone may be ready to yell abuse when I must correct a stallion. That little blast of fresh breath spray is a wonderful tool!They really get a funny look on their face as well. It gives you a longer window for reaction because it sprays a distance.( takes all of the fun away from a young and quick smart aleck )

Cowboy sounds like most of the young stallions we have here. Nice and mellow is a good thing! If only they stayed that way with out more work.
 

Lee Ann Cornelison
Neonate
Username: Lacor54

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Tuesday, July 05, 2005 - 08:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the suggestions. We will try the breath spray first, then if that doesn't work, we'll try the hot potato. My husband had read about having them bite a hot potato instead of you which makes sense but I think the breath spray, if it will work, would be the kinder thing to try first. Thanks for all your ideas!
 

Rooty (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.196.103.102
Posted on Tuesday, July 05, 2005 - 01:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Besides, you have to make sure they actually connect with the potato and not your arm!
 

Cathy
Weanling
Username: Cathy

Post Number: 30
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, July 06, 2005 - 12:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have heard of the hot potaoto also. I just have never figured out how to attach it to my arm without burning, where to put it so it is where he will bite, and just what day to wear it that he is going to bite it. LOL
I just go with a good hard slap. It has worked with them all, and none of them are head shy.
I understand though about the abuse problem.
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.109
Posted on Wednesday, July 06, 2005 - 10:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That potato thing keeps turning up! I think it was first published in 1940 or so as a remedy. It is not a viable option to expect to direct a hot potato into a stallions mouth at the blink of an eye. There are more effective and safer methods than that one. And remember, for that to work, you must have a hot potato ready and waiting each and every time the stallion attempts to bite. Each time that the stallion attempts the bite and does not encounter the potato, you have just taught him the "gamblers" attitude, that he may get away with it the next time. Nope, it just doesn't pass the logic test.

Like Cathy mentioned, a good hard slap will get their attention. I will suggest that the slap be given in the rib cage area. That way, you do not engage in the mouth play game with the stallion. (you also do not have to aim at a moving target)Correction would be best when directed away from the mouth and head and towards the large flat area of the barrel.
 

Renee (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 203.49.156.163
Posted on Thursday, July 07, 2005 - 01:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have found that you need to be really alert and watching stallions movements when ever around him. Whenever he turns with intention to bite (you learn when its coming) i give him a quick hard flick in the nose, with one hand, and without stoping what i am doing with the other hand and then turn and carry on as if nothing had happened. I try to catch him at the same stage every time, and he thinks he is doing it to himself. He jolts back, and stands and has a think about it. I have only had this one colt for 2 months, and he was a real little nipper when i first got him, he now very very rarely even tries, and my last stallion that i bred and raised learnt the same way and he never ever bites. It is not so much playing games with him, as if you can time it around the same stage each time, he really thinks he's doing it himself.
 

Lori
Neonate
Username: Lori

Post Number: 4
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Thursday, July 07, 2005 - 07:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You can get them to quit biting. It takes something different for each horse.
The knot on the end of the leadrope worked best for us, and I completely agree with getting back to work immediately or punishment and KEEP working, (like keep walking). Loud NO BITE!! helps alot.

Click on this link to see that this is our 3 year old,http://groups.msn.com/Stallionhandlingandtraining/general.msnw?action=get_messag e&mview=0&ID_Message=1055 and he actaully sticks his tongue out for kisses. You cannot see his tongue, but you can see the muscle position in his face, that his tongue is out. No biting anymore! Lori
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.142
Posted on Thursday, July 07, 2005 - 07:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

At the expense of being ridiculed I will pass on one other method. A flat stick with a few small nails sticking out. When he encounters the working end of that stick with his mouth, he figures you have the "best" bite! Like Lori, I also make a loud command, mine is a horrible gutteral noise I make deep in my throat. All of my horses know that means business!

I have used the stick on only the worst of the biters. It does work, and in a quick manner. He does it to himself and does not care to try it many more times. Of course, you do not actually hit the horse, just have the stick placed where he is heading to with his teeth. Once again, this is used on dangerous biters.
 

pam smith
Neonate
Username: Willipamm

Post Number: 1
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Friday, August 19, 2005 - 03:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I read in one of a trainers book that he often said "backing stops biting". We have a 2 year old paint stud that liked to try and nip. After I read the backing thing I figured I'd try it. The next time he went to try and nip me I put my hand on his nose and pushed him backwards saying very firmly "back, back" and made him back 4 or 5 steps. He only tried one more time with me doing the same to him and now he never tries to bite or nip anyone, and in fact is real loving and respectful to all. I think the reason behind the backing is that it is a submissive thing for the horse to have to back away from you. If you watch the head mare, she will make them back away from her when she walks towards them. Anyway, it sure worked for him. And I'm glad as he got to be too quick at dodging us trying to smack him for trying to bite.
 

cassandra walker
Neonate
Username: Cassie08

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, July 06, 2006 - 12:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i have a colt that will be turning a month next week i am 14 yrs old and this will be my 2nd horse to train but my first stud to work with. ive herd that the more you mess with a stud the calmer they get is this true? when your working out a stud will it ever work better for diffrent people?
 

Michelle Taylor
Neonate
Username: Khomagic1

Post Number: 3
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Sunday, August 06, 2006 - 03:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think some colts are just more inclined to want to bite than others or be agressive in the first place . My first stallion was awful as a 2 year old wanted to nip, always grabed the halter etc. he would try and get away from you and just do naughty stuff. He was tall and agile and could make you nervous. The best way we got him to stop was to give him a job. Once he went to work he was to busy thinking about working to be that way. And he is a very nice 5 year old stallion now who is a joy to be around.

I kept one of his foals who is now 17 months old. This colt has NEVER once shown any desire to be agressive at all, he does grab the occasional lead rope but that is when he is tied up he likes to untie himself. As soon as I so much as look at him like he better not do something he stops. So I think it's sometimes just part of the personality.
 

Cindy Moore
Weanling
Username: Chorse_1998

Post Number: 24
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Monday, August 07, 2006 - 06:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The hot potato thing actually was in one of the Walter Farly books, about the Black Stallion's daughter. Now if there is a real horse training book out there that suggests a hot potato as a biting cure, I have not read it. But that is where I read it at........Cindy



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