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Should this guy be gelded?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Stallion Questions » Should this guy be gelded? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Sheila Braun
Neonate
Username: Chirons_grove

Post Number: 1
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Sunday, September 16, 2007 - 03:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 20-year-old palomino saddlebred stallion named "Scotlands Golden Moonbeam" (you can see him on allbreedpedigrees.com). He has nice ground manners and is extremely showy. However he has been stalled for 15 years with little contact with other horses so socially he is pretty far behind. I have ridden him once and when not distracted by needing to protect his harem he is a dream to ride. He is extraordinarily herd-bound but gentle with me (and I am small). My question is the above. Is there any way to train him to pay attention to me rather than to the whinnying of other horses? Would gelding help?
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 411
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Sunday, September 16, 2007 - 03:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Why don't you ride him where the other horses cannot see him?
 

Emma
Breeding Stock
Username: Emma

Post Number: 191
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Sunday, September 16, 2007 - 06:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't think gelding a 20yo old stallion will do much. This is now behavioural now, not hormonal and I think you will find he is exactly the same even after gelding. Be consistant with him and demand that he works properly. Work with him untill you get his attention and then that is the time to put him away. Don't keep working him till he looses all patience and then gets cranky, get what you are looking for and then end it on a good note. Then each day extend the demands on him untill he is paying you complete attention the whole work out. Keep him collected and working forward, if he is working on the bit and from behind it will be very hard for him to NOT pay attention to you!
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 243
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, September 20, 2007 - 04:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Shelia- I think I am correct in telling you that a horse that age would be risky to geld. I believe the older they are, the greater the risk. (Jos will correct me if I'm wrong for certain :-)
 

Phyllis Schroder
Neonate
Username: Shadowbend

Post Number: 5
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Saturday, September 22, 2007 - 01:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

In a 20 yr old horse his habits will be well engrained so it may take alot of time and patience but you can get him more attentive and more social. I know my stallions love having company and I always keep several of the geldings right next to them so they can visit over the fence and often they share the same paddocks. Since your guy is not use to being quite this social I would start with a quiet older gelding nearby but not reachable in case he was nasty twards him and slowly move him closer so that they become aquainted and eventually can share a fenceline and each others company. Of course, there cannot be any mares in the paddock/pasture with the stallion or gelding.
You may want to start working on his attentiveness by ground working him in a round pen or safe area that he can see the mares from but is still a good distance away from them. Don't tolerate him just standing at the round pen fence hollering at the mares but make him work and focus his attention more and more on you and less on other things. As his attention to you and his work get better slowly move him to working closer and closer to the area the mares are in. Then progress to riding closer and closer to the mares area. It helps to set up a consistant routine from start to finish and a work plan. He will eventually realize when you start the routine (bridling, cetain halter,ect.) that it's worktime not visit the mares time.
I have always kept my round pen just off the mares pasture so there is purposely plenty of distraction (and the mares do come to the fenceline and try to visit). They have to learn to deal with distractions and know when it's time to work no matter what is going on or who is around them. Just be patient and find what works best for you both and go from there.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1566
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Saturday, September 22, 2007 - 01:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Gelding of older stallions - as noted - will often not reduce stallion-like behaviours as they are learned behaviour rather than hormonally driven.

It may also be more dangerous to geld older stallions as there is a greater risk of hemorrhage.



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