MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

To Geld or not to geld...

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Stallion Questions » To Geld or not to geld... « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Sara S
Nursing Foal
Username: Sara1971

Post Number: 16
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2007 - 10:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a gorgeous dun Welsh Section A two year old colt. I initially bought him with a view to licensing him and standing him at stud and breeding a couple of my mares to him. However I am having some real handling problems. I also keep him separated from my mares for obvious reasons which I feel is a shame for him as he lives on his own but he is turned out 24/7. I am now thinking about gelding him in the autumn. I feel that my relationship with him is going rapidly downhill and I either sell him on to a stud or someone that will use him as a stud more than I will and has more expereince handling him or I keep him and geld him, and show him , let him live with my mares and break him to drive when he is older. What would you guys do if you had a really good colt? Sell on or geld and keep? I think he may have a better quality of life with me if he is gelded but is it a waste to cut a good stallion prospect??
 

Emily West
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 188
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2007 - 12:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sara,
I suppose if you really wanted some foals out of him you could sell him and retain some breedings but go with your instincts. I don't think gelding a really good stallion is wrong. I know that one of the top natural horsemen gelded one of his really nice colts out of great bloodlines because of how stud like he was. I think he partially did it to because his staff would be handling him a lot and he figured he could be dangerous. So, no don't feel bad about gelding him if you want to keep him.
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 582
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2007 - 02:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sara,
Considering the odds, gelding tends to make the most sense. Not many stallions hit the upper cream of the crop to be true sires.
Even if you sold him as a stallion, that doesn't guarantee that the person will keep him intact if his behavior declines.
One of my biggest rules in regards to stallions, is that behavior comes first. They EARN their testicles. One HINT of an issue, and they come off swiftly...
If you are having thoughts of gelding, you are probably right in your assumption.

I had/have a really good colt (he is gelded now!). I went through the same thing as you. There were a lot of folks who came down on me pretty hard for gelding him, but I made the right decision. It was the right thing for him, and mostly for me.
 

Sara S
Nursing Foal
Username: Sara1971

Post Number: 17
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2007 - 03:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Heather and Emily. Heather, did your colt calm down when he was gelded? I would hate to do it to find his behaviour didn't change!
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 583
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2007 - 03:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Sara,

:-) YES, and much sooner than I anticipated.

He had always been a GOOD colt, and his sudden shift the other way made it a "no brainer" for me. He went from a quiet, well mannered yearling to defensive and defiant. I had intended on leaving him intact, and evaluating him as time went on...but he lost the right.

Within 2 weeks, he came back down and was much less distracted. Granted, he was a yearling and had just begun the testosterone surge....but it was enough (along with a broken finger) to make the decision.
It was a gamble, so to speak. He has/had tons of talent, the genetics, the looks, etc and I was willing to go the long haul. Prepared to put him with a professional to have him campaigned if necessary. But, I just could not justify the shift in behavior.
I am happy to say, that he is a better horse for it. A stallion life is a solitary life and one FULL of rules and responsibilities unlike mares/geldings. He is happy, and I have a beautifully behaved animal I don't have to worry about (or worry about other people).

Think of it this way Sara, if you geld him, and his personality DOESN'T change...at least he's not off breeding and perpetuating the problem. But, if his behaviors are stallion-like, the likelyhood is that removing the testosterone factor (in time), will bring him back to earth.
At his age, those behaviors are not ingrained and will disappear as the hormone levels drop.
 

Sara S
Nursing Foal
Username: Sara1971

Post Number: 18
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2007 - 04:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Heather thats really helpful input. It is definately Stallion behaviour. I see glimpses of the 'gelding underneath!' now and then and he can be a very sweet soul, just obviously having trouble handling his hormones. I would hate for it to get worse and worse. Thanks so much for your advice
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 352
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2007 - 05:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sara,

The saying goes really good stallion/colt makes a really good gelding. I had bred a very well put together paso stud colt. The stallion owner really did not want me to geld but we wanted to keep him and he never would have gotten to get ponyied all over the place for his first 2 years if he had not been gelded. He is a spectacular looking gelding and moves like a dream and we are all happier. There will always be good studs out there to breed too. So if you really would like to keep him I say geld and be happy.
 

Sara S
Nursing Foal
Username: Sara1971

Post Number: 19
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 03, 2007 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you very much Jan for your opinion. I was looking at him earlier and realised that he is stunning and will remain stunning even if he is gelded. I somehow wonder if I am taking something away from him (apart from the obvious! lol) but I think he will be even greater gelded as I will be able to do more with him. My showing for this season hasnt really taken off with him because of his behaviour so hopefully that will be another plus- I can get him out and about to more shows!
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 353
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 12:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't think gelding has taken anything but studdy behavior from our horse. Some of the greatest horses have been geldings! Look at Seabiscut...gelding :-) A gelding can have his mind on work and not on "other" things :-)
 

Heather Cooke
Neonate
Username: Hcvideo

Post Number: 6
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

From what I have read, SeaBisciut was a stallion but never stood at stud, Charles Howard bred him to only one mare after retiring. He didn't want him to leave the farm to stand at stud. Not sure what happen to the foal, the mare was not breed very well.
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 354
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, June 04, 2007 - 04:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Heather...you are so right...I guess that is a good reminder to check on facts.....he was a stud and I guess he sired 108 foals at stud..I did check and I guess John Henry, PharLap, Exterminator are some great racing geldings.:-)
 

Jen
Weanling
Username: Jens

Post Number: 32
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Friday, September 28, 2007 - 08:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I met John Henry at Kentucky Horse Park many years ago and he was a bit of a nasty boy when we were looking at him. Not friendly at all. However, perhaps the constant flow of people turned him off. I'd be nasty if I were a display piece also in my retirement.



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US