MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

How early can a colt breed

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Stallion Questions » How early can a colt breed « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Trisha
Posted on Saturday, July 26, 2003 - 11:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi. I am just wondering how old a colt is before he is fertile. I have a mare who foaled out in April. We are planning to rebreed AI on her next cycle. She was palped on Wed, and vet wanted to AI Fri and Sun, but we couldn't get the semen. The barn owner has a 13 mo stallion prospect that has been pastured with my mare and foal. He was very interested in the mare when she presented, "talked" to her and was hanging out like he was ready. My vet said he probably couldn't impregnante her yet, but to keep them separate anyway just in case he gets frisky and mounts her and potentially contaminates her. They were put in separate adjoining paddocks that day before I left. The next day some new horses were brought the the property (had previously been there and returned), and to make them a herd, the horses were all turned out together (stud colt with my mare). I was ok with that as the barn owner said that since the new gelding was "herd king", the baby was no longer exhibiting stallion behaviors. What really concerned me though is that yesterday when I got out there, the stud colt was in the foaling stall with my mare and filly. I am baffled at why the owner would do this. My horses are leaving next week anyway, so I am not approaching that issue. My question is if a colt this young would or could breed my mare. He is nice, but not what I was looking for in my next baby.
Thanks.
Trisha
 

Sandy
Posted on Saturday, July 26, 2003 - 12:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Trisha,
My understanding is that there has been yearling colts that have been able to get mares pregnant. It actually happens a lot.
Each horse is different as to what age they hit sexual maturity. I have a friend who actually did stand a yearling colt this year to a few mares and he did get them all in foal.
If you say that your stud colt is "nice" but not what you're looking for in your next foal, then maybe you should just geld him if you don't consider him nice enough for yourself. Then you won't have to worry about it anymore, especially if he is already exhibiting stallion like behavior.
 

Sandy
Posted on Saturday, July 26, 2003 - 01:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry Trisha,
I just re-read your post and realized that it's not your stud colt.
The barn owner has absolutely no right to corral his stud colt with your mare and foal without your approval. If your mare does end up pregnant by this colt I would definitely make the barn owner responsible for terminating the pregnancy.
 

Trisha
Posted on Saturday, July 26, 2003 - 02:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am not sure I would terminate the pregnancy, he is an Art Deco bred Pinto Oldenburg, but he is not the Thoroshire I was planning for, you know? It just wouldn't be what I was looking for...exactly. I think part of the barn owner's problem is that she still sees him as her baby, not as a yearling stallion prospect. She is a good friend, and I don't want to hurt her feelings, or make her feel like she is not making good decisions, but I need to discuss this with her. Thank you for the info. It is kind of what I figured. Here's hoping nothing happened!
 

Sandy
Posted on Monday, July 28, 2003 - 05:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I probably wouldn't terminate the pregnancy either, just because of the fact I'm not that type of person, but there are plenty of people out there who would. If the colt's owner is a good friend of yours, then I definitely would talk it over with her. And maybe even see if she would be willing to pay for half of the vet costs or whatever to see if the mare is pregnant. If it turns out that she is in foal, I guess you could always sell the foal next year to try to make up for your loss of not being able to breed to the stud you really wanted, and hope that the foaling goes well and your mare doesn't end up hurt from it or something. Which probably wouldn't happen, but you just never know.
I'll keep my fingers crossed for ya that your mare is still open!
Good luck.
 

Trisha
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 01:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, as luck would have it, she was open, although I did think of calling my friend and telling her Abby was pregnant, just to see her reaction! ;-) anyway, she wasn't ready to cycle yet(posted a message in problem mares about that one), so the vet gave her a shot of prostaglandin, and we are looking to inseminate early next week. Keep your fingers crossed!
Thanks again.
Trisha
 

Sandy
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Trisha,
Glad to hear that you are going to be able to get the foal you really want out of your mare!
Good Luck.



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US