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Overbreeding a mare?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 1 » Overbreeding a mare? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Susan Haley
Neonate
Username: Dadadoris

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 22, 2006 - 02:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A general question...
A friends mare has had a foal and withint two weeks, she had put it back to the stallion.
This mare has now had its 5th foal in succession without a break at all.
I personally feel she has over bred the mare "trying to get her monies worth" and I have tried to explain to her that the mare would fair better if she was barren every other year.
Am I wrong to suggest this?
The mare is only 8 and has had 5 foals to date.

Like I said I feel she is overbreeding this horse.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10601
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Saturday, April 22, 2006 - 03:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes, you're wrong. :-)

Nature has a remarkable ability to moderate the reproductive behaviour of the equine - if the mare is not meant to have a foal, she won't get in foal. In the wild, it is usual for most mares to have a foal every year, and then eventually when they become barren they are often driven out of the herd by the stallion, and eaten by a passing predator.

So - as long as your friends mare is capable of getting pregnant, it is perfectly normal and natural for her to be bred and produce a foal, and is not being "overbred".
 

Susan Haley
Neonate
Username: Dadadoris

Post Number: 2
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 08:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK thanks.
Kind of put my mind at rest... Though I would have thought having a lame horse continually having a foal was not good on the mare... Sorry forgot to mention that, but I suppose it makes no difference.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10602
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 11:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The degree, severity and cause of lameness may be an issue. My primary concern in that instance would be if the lameness were a hereditary issue, and if that were the case then of course any reproduction of such a problem would be undesirable. Physically for the mare, - again depending upon the degree and cause of lameness - the additional weight of pregnancy could be an isssue, but that is not an absolute. Many lame mares are bred - it is one of the advantages one has when owning a mare over a gelding, as a lame gelding is still a lame gelding (read "pasture or stable ornament").
 

Cindy Moore
Nursing Foal
Username: Chorse_1998

Post Number: 18
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 11:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


I have several mares that have had babies just about every year. Nature will decide when it is time to rest out for one year. Personally I feel that a preganant mare gets better care than one that is not pregnant, as what you put into the mare comes out in the foal. So my broodmares usually have the best hay and grain, all the vaccinations, and worming more in a timely than the horses that are not pregnant. Not saying anyone is deprived around here, just saying I usually keep an eye on my broodmares a little closer.
Cindy
}
 

melissa
Breeding Stock
Username: Mbgirl

Post Number: 189
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There are some mares who are breed year after year, then when they are not breed get sad. I have a mare who wants to be a mommy this year, but she is not breed. I will have to make sure she don't go through the fence to get the other mares foals.Alot of the mare love to be mother. I would like to have the mare in good shape. If she is lame make sure she is able to carry the pregnant weigh. I wouldn't want to put the mares health at risk no nothing.Also what are the people taking good care of the mare and foal that matter alot.I agreed with Cindy, pregnant mares get alot better care the those who are not.
Melissa
 

Jennifer S
Neonate
Username: Jens

Post Number: 10
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 11, 2006 - 08:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Now you all may get mad at me, but in the wild there are not Caslick procedures, Regumate, Mare plus, stitching up after vaginal tearing.... we work pretty darn hard at getting mare pregant year after year. I'd say it's an individual thing. I'm thinking my mare needs a rest after 2. I'd like to ride her a little, & she has had a big foal & probably will have another (knock wood) in a few more weeks. A mare in the wild that was lame would be eaten by the passing predator before being able to have foal after foal after foal. Caring about your equine friends should be number 1 over profit. Money can be made with inanimate objects...horses can be profitable, but we must love them first...otherwise sell boats. If the horse does great year after year, & likes being a mom, have one every year. Good judgement must be used on individuals.



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