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Strangles

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 1 » Strangles « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

melissa
Breeding Stock
Username: Mbgirl

Post Number: 102
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 23, 2006 - 10:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello,
My mare Dixie finished her med. on Wed. We will see if she starting to cough or running nose again. Dixie has not coughed in two weeks now, just a running nose. All is good for now hope it stays that way. We are not giving her nothing as this moment to see how she does. Dixie was away from the other horse until TUES. she decide it was time to be with others. Dixie push down a cowwire fence. We have never had any other horses do that not even the stud. Now Dixie is with the others she is happy. She could see them before, but didn't like being along I guess. I will let you all know how she does.
thanks melissa
 

melissa
Breeding Stock
Username: Mbgirl

Post Number: 112
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 02:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello,
I went to check on the mare Sunday morning before church no signs of a nose running. I went to check her after church she was fine. The vet said maybe she just has a cold or allegry.The vet said if the nose was not running I could let her out of the stall. I let her out about a hour, then it was time to feed. I notice her nose was running a little bit, but no yellow stuff just clear. I left her put up. Monday morning at feeding time it was running a little bit, but I left her up anyway. I checked her at lunch time today it is running a little bit of yellow on one side. This mare has no cough, no fever just a running nose on and out. This mare is eating and playing fine.I know horse will run clear nosing, but what is up with the thick yellow stuff sat night, then nothing. Then we go back to a little yellow running not much. I taught horses with strangles nosing will run the whole time. This mare has had all of her shots including the strangles shot. We have given her pencillin shots on three difference times plus a tucoprim power for 5 days.While this mare is on medications she shows not signs.I am giving this mare cough free for allegry. When the mare did have a cough about 4 weeks ago the vet came her steriod shots then she hasn't cough since. What is up with this mare? The mare neck is fine no problems of strangles showing yet. My vet said sometimes the strangles can hide int the neck area in that we can't see. He wants to scope her, but I don't know if we can't afford it. The vet already culture this mare once already. We have only had this mare since Jan 2006. Thank you all for your help.
Melissa
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 121
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 02:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Melissa, we have several horses in our barn that are sick at the moment, all of them have had their vaccinations and it's not strangles, just a runny nose and cough. They go off their feed for a few days and then bounce right back.. if your mare does have strangles, don't fret too much, we've had a few that had that too (we buy horses from sale barnes and you never know what you'll drag home with you when you do that) and they were alright. (some don't even need antibiotics, the illness just needs to run it's course) it's not pretty to watch, but once they break open and drain, the worst is over and we'll give them antibiotics to help clear them up and get them of their feet again. Good luck, hopefully, your mare will improve and not make the rest of your horses sick as well.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 125
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, February 27, 2006 - 03:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Melissa- if she were my horse, I'd just wait a bit and see what happens. Often times, things will resolve themselves, if not, then you can decide what you can afford to do..and if it is it wise to spend $5000 treating a $500 horse? If it's allergies, it will likely continue but at least none of your other horses will get sick. I've seen strangles come out the side of the head just above the eye ( truely gross ) also in the jaw area on the side, but most common is under the jaw line, like where the halter rests. The horses we've had come down with it though didn't go as long before they were swollen up and broke open as what your mare is doing, so let's hope it's an allergy thing or something more minor. Good luck. Ev
 

melissa
Breeding Stock
Username: Mbgirl

Post Number: 113
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

E Watkins,
I agree with you about the cost of the mare. We are putting more in her then we paid for her almost. Last night I gave her a pencillin shot,because her nose was running yellow stuff again. I gave her pencillin shot this morning as well. This mare has been on and off medications for about 6 weeks now. Do you know if with strangles they have a nose run on and off like this. This mare is not coughing at this time, no fever just a nasty nose. If it is just allergy I will felt better, but who knows. I have two mares going to foal in April and May I am worried about the new foals coming. We have her stalled at the time beening,but I can't keep her stalled long. I had her out with the gelding horses last week.
THANK YOU,
melissa
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 365
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 11:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Melissa,
I believe that there is a blood test for strangles. At least there was about 15years ago.
I have to agree with E Watkins. I learned the hard way several years ago about treating the "unknown" . Sometimes its best to let nature takes it course. Vireal stuff needs to run its course and no antibotic will help unless it has a secondary infection. I don't treat with antibiotic unless absolutley needed. We had a boarder that ran nasty yellow stuff last year and ran two coarses of meds on her and then after that let it run for another few weeks and finally it cleared up. I would think that horses like others once something is irritated then it may take time to clear up even after infection is gone... Allergies are like this too, once irritated it takes a bit of time to get back to normal. If cultures are neg. (sometimes it takes a bit before something will show up in a culture)Then I guess i would let it run its course. Yes strangels can hide and not been seen-I think alot of vets treat "strangles" without knowing for sure.

If she has been out with the geldings then they have been exposed already.... I guess I would toss her back out with them too, no need to keep her cooped up in a barn, the germs are floating in the barn anyways. I believe that "strangles" can be passed by just liquid particles floating in the air(anyone else ?? I'm gonna go look it up) .... so let her out, the fresh air will do her good.
I have a goat that we have treated three times with antibiotic and still the nose keeps getting crusty. We are thinking alergies too, it seems to get worse when the weather warms back up to the high 40's or better.
Hope things get better for you , I know those vet bills can get frustrating

Kim
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 132
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Melissa- Ditto what Kim said, we don't treat with antibiotics unless it's really necessary. With strangles, if you treat too soon it can be really bad. Our rule of thumb is this, if their glands are swollen or there is welling in the face, we wait till they break open to treat them. If you catch it early, you can treat it and they get less ill, but I've seen them get it AGAIN the next year when they are treated that way! My understanding is that the "germ" that causes strangles can stay in the soil for a very long period of time and then pop back up. It seems like every year we'll see a case or so, generally, it's the yearlings we see it in, or a new horse that hasn't been around long will get it. The first case we ever had was from a horse we bought at a sale, two days after she came home, she broke open and was right in the main barn when it happened. (and she came from the sale with health certificate that she was checked and healthy the day we bought her, it happens) We've never lost a horse to strangles, but it's certainly not the most pleasant thing to deal with either. Let's hope it's just allergies. I would keep an eye on her, make sure she is eating, if you've vaccinated and wormed her already, give her some time and see what happens.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10485
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 01:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There is a good information page on strangles at that link location. Note that under optimum conditions in the laboratory the causative agent, Streptococcus equi (which is a bacteria) has been found to survive environmentally only for about 2 months. If can be maintained in the horse itself for considerably longer, but not in the soil or other area outside the horse.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 137
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 02:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos- so if we have not horses come in from the outside, and have not taken our horses anywhere, how does it get started again going through the young horses? it always seems to show up in the same pens where the young horses are kept from weaning till they are two, so I assumed that what our "old resident vet" has told us has some validity.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10488
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 03:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Not to decry the abilitites of your vet, but unfortunately some of the latest research is not accessed or reviewed by everyone, with a prevalent tendency to rely on "traditional" knowledge rather than reviewing the newer research that may be in conflict with that knowledge...

Asymptomatic carrier animals seem to be the most likely cause for reinfection (follow that link), rather than environmentally, unless the pathogen has somehow been frozen (follow that link) - although it will typically still require optimal conditions in those circumstances to survive as well.

To clarify further, I will take the liberty of quoting Dr. John Timoney from his Report Of The Committee On Infectious Diseases Of Horses (page 313 - Non-Immune Approaches To The Prevention And Control Of Streptococcus Equi Infections):

Environmental Survival. Older reviews, e.g. Stableforth and Galloway (1959), cite earlier studies that indicated that S. equi remained viable in pus for weeks. More recently, Jorm (1992) noted survival for up to 2 months on previously disinfected wood and glass at 2C and 20C. In our studies of S. equi CF32 in local soil (Lexington, KY), horse feces and in water, we have observed survival in soil and feces for less than 3 days. In sterilized feces, viable S. equi were detectable for 14 days suggesting a potently hostile effect of the fecal flora. Survival in water was detected for up to 40 days when a total die-off occurred similar to that noted by Jorm. Thus, drinking water and its container is potentially an important source of S. equi during an outbreak since nasal discharges from affected horses are certain to enter as they drink. Daily disinfection of the water trough is essential to minimize transmission during an outbreak.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 139
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 03:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks so much for the information Jos, I don't have any doubt that "Doc" is not up on the latest and greatest. He's a salty old guy and has saved a few horses for me, but thanks to you I'm a little wiser and won't take everything I'm told for factual in the future.

The "carrier" idea is possible, except that it seems so unlikely as once the horses reach a certain age they are moved out into stalls and the pens remain empty (sometimes for months)until the next group of weanlings are moved into the area. Generally it's during the winter months that we'll see an outbreak if we are going to have one and the colts would have been in that pen probably 3 or 4 months before we see any illness. Whatever the cause, strangles does rear it's ugly head on occasion and we have to deal with it when it does.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10489
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 07:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Do you come into contact with other horses at the same time that you come into contact with the weanlings that subsequently become infected? My guess is yes, and that means that you yourself can be carrying the pathogen on your clothing from the carrier animal to the to-be-infected weanling. Remember that while the virus may not remain in the environment for an extended period, it can certainly remain on your clothing for a few mninutes!

If this is an ongoing problem on your farm, then you may wish to start to carry out isolation practices. Changes of clothing and footwear, and making sure that "clean" animals are dealt with before potential carrier animals. It's a pain to do, but you may want to try and eliminate the problem from your herd by doing it.
 

melissa
Breeding Stock
Username: Mbgirl

Post Number: 114
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 28, 2006 - 08:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello, I was told by a few folks to let this mare out with the other horses. I went to check on her at lunch she was fine. I let her out in the pasture, she starting running, she was so happy. Then I notice she was in the pond having a great time. If this mare had the strangles she would not be having a great time like this. I am thinking it is more allegry stuff. After the mare got through swimming she went to running with the other horses. The mare is still eating great. I will watch her for now. I didn't give her anymore pencillin tonight, per a few friends who think it is just a allegry thing.I will keep you all update.
Thank you,
MELISSA
 

Sandy
Weanling
Username: Sandysz

Post Number: 24
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Sunday, February 26, 2006 - 09:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Melissa,
this sounds very similiar to what my gelding and I have gone through. Same color nasal discharge, cough, no temp, not raspy, etc. After the vet said this past spring that he might have the beginning of COPD, I asked for an allergy test. Appx 276.00 It came back that he is allergic to Brome, Timothy, mouse epithelials, feathers,corn, beets,etc. He is on allergy shots now and is a whole lot better. Hope that this helps.
Sandy K.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 143
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 10:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos- the problem with isolation is we have 50 head of horses on ten acres.. in our situation, it's just really difficult to accomplish. In more recent years, we've not had a lot of problem with illnesses, this year I'm afraid is not going to be that way. Last night we did find a horse that is swollen up, it's definately strangles, my biggest fear is for the foals, I seem to remember reading that foals don't usually contract this illness. Is that correct?
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 146
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 11:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I did a little research on my own, it seems "young" horses are most likely to get strangles. Will the mares immunities protect the foals while they are nursing? or should I expect to see some sick babies as well?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10490
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 11:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Unfortunately, the degree to which a foal will be affected will depend entirely on if it received sufficient colostral antibodies to fight the disease. For those foals that did not receive sufficient passive immunity there is a fairly high chance that it will prove fatal if they become infected. This means that it becomes essential to make sure that your foals have indeed achieved passive transfer, so you will probably want to be checking foal IgG levels at 9-12 hours if you aren't already and supplementing orally or intravenously if insufficient levels are not present. Bear in mind though that passive transfer alone is not going to guarantee protection as you can still have good IgG levels in the foals, but not have the correct antibodies to protect against specific diseases.

It may also be worth your while identifying which of your current animals are carriers of the disease by testing and eliminating them from the herd, or putting them in a different location from susceptible animals.

I don't envy your position. It's not a pleasant one to be in... :-(
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10491
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 11:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Melissa: As you have given your mare a dose or two of penicillin, there is the possibility that the mare has responded to that treatment and is feeling and appearing better, but still infectious if she does indeed have strangles - which I hope she doesn't. The simple fact of running around and playing does not indicate that she is not infectious, and you could have exposed your other animals to the disease if she does indeed have strangles. The people that advised you to do that would have served you better to advise you to make sure that your mare was indeed healthy (i.e. free of any disease) before turning her out with other horses. Chances are it's not strangles, and may well be an allergy, but I don't think I would have done the same thing based on what you mentioned the condition of one of the animals to be. I tend to follow the adage of "better safe than sorry"... :-(
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 148
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 11:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos- no kidding, it's not one I'm looking foward to dealing with either. In the past, when we've had a sick horse, it's always been one that was stalled outdoors away from the main barn so while it was inconvenient and a pain to deal with, it wasn't as risky as what this situation is shaping up to be. I would love to know where this started..my guess would be from an outside horse that came in for a show in the past week or so. What is the incubation time from exposure to actual showing signs of illness? My guess is the healthy mares from TX are the ones that brought it into the barn, they've not been ill, but the first horse that came down with this was stalled beside them. However, there was a visiting horse that was sick that same day..so the carrier may not have been those mares but an outside horses that was there for a show two weeks prior.
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 377
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 12:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Melissa has said that the mare was already out with the geldings in the earlier part of the week, or last week, they have been exposed to whatever already. She has treated the horse for six weeks with antibiotics on and off.
Melissa , I would have done the same . Depending on your barn situation and how air tight it is could cause additional problems as well for your mare. I have seen more sick horse that are stalled indoors durning winter months and don't get fresh air.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 149
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 12:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kim- I'm in the same situation, we have a confirmed case of strangles in the barn now, the yearlings that are inside have runny noses too, though not severe at all like you'd expect with strangles. Anyway, about everyone has been exposed at this point, so we'll just treat the ones that are ill and the new ones that crop up and ride this tidal wave till the end. My biggest worry is for the new babies.. the first mares are due next week, though none of them show signs of being ill yet so maybe, just maybe.. they'll have enough immunity to fight it off and pass that along in their colostrum. I think we'll put a new rule in place in our barn after this is over.. from December thru April, NO NEW HORSES and no visitors!
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 379
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 12:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I sure wish you the best EV. How have they been confirmed cases ? Blood test ?
Kim
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10492
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 12:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Incubation period (time from exposure to first signs of disease) is 3 to 21 days.

Concerning turning possibly infected horses out with other horses - remember that even is they have been previously exposed, that does not necessarily mean that they did indeed contract the disease at that time. Repeating the contact will increase the chance of pathogenic transfer. This is why there are strict quarantine procedures used in facilities that have infected animals! It is also why the attitude of "oh well they've already been exposed" results in continual spread of the disease - and increases the possibility of spreading the disease to other locations as well, simply because one runs the risk of more exposure to the disease personally and then possible transmission to other farms.

Last year for example, we had to breed a mare with frozen semen on a farm that had an active strangles outbreak. We made sure that the visit to this farm was always the last one of the day, or that we returned to the office and scrubbed and changed before going on the another location. We put on surgical scrubs over our clothes before getting out of the truck, and we put plastic bootees on our feet over our regular footwear before getting out of the truck. Certain pieces of equipment were left at that location (twitch/buckets/lube bottle etc.) and any equipment that could not be left (ultrasound!) was held by one person who only touched that equipment. The probe was covered with a rectal sleeve that was left at the farm after we were done, and everything was wiped off with chlorhexidine before being put back in the truck. Excessive? Maybe, but there are obvious concerns about the infection being spread to another farm... :-(
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 380
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 01:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, in your case Jos, I agree with being a bit excessive as you are traveling from one place to the next and have a business that you are dealing with and possibly carrying the disease from farm to farm.... I too would be very careful as I would not want it to come back on my service as being the cause of a outbreak.Nor would I want to bring it back to my farm. I too also take precaution when bringing a new horse to our farm, they do get quarintined as best as possible for a period of time---just in general.No nose to nose contact, last one to be handled, no sharing water buckets or feed tubs of any kind. But I see this case as Melissa has, that the time frame in which she has been already treated---Off and on for six weeks, plenty of time. If its on my farm, with my animals, then I look at it a bit differenty then a barn full of others animals. The state will quaritine the whole farm . It doesn't matter who has it or not. If its a confirmed case in a horse , then I don't turn them out with others, but this has been treated for Melissa for the time frame listed.

I still stand with how I feel about turning your horse out Melissa. I do agree with Jos and how things can happen with strangles.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 152
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 01, 2006 - 01:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'll see what we can do about getting the sick ones out of the barn.. I just do not know how we'll manage it as there are only so many pens to put them in outside. (and two of them are stud colts, it's 75 here today, spring is in the air and sick or not, they'd probably have one thing on their mind if they get together with the fillies) I'll pass along the information as things unfold in the days and weeks ahead. The first mares will be 320 days next week, none of them show signs of being ill thus far, so we'll keep our fingers crossed and do what we can to contain this mess.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 348
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 01:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just an update, thus far, none of the youngsters are showing any signs of getting sick, we have had two mares that are expecting foals in May become ill, but they are holding their own. All the other cases are recovering well.
Jos- Someone told me that horses which have had strangles are contagious for 8 months afterwards? can you confirm or obliterate that statement for me? Thanks, Ev
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 349
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 01:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos- Nevermind, I followed the previous link and found the answer to my question. I'm going to suggest to the lady who is concerned about her horses that she have them vaccinated, that way she won't have to worry quite so much about her neighbors horses infecting her own.
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 536
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 10:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ev, glad to hear everyone is doing ok.
Kim
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 374
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kim- so far, so good.. and no new cases in the past week, so maybe we are on the down hill side of this thing..
 

Jamie Lester
Neonate
Username: Jamie_l

Post Number: 2
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 03:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What is the best way to vaccinate for Strangles. IM or Intranasal? Also, is it safe to vaccinate for it within two weeks of a pregnant mare foaling? I have never vaccinated before, but I have heard it is wise to do when you are raising foals. Thanks in advance.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 425
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 03:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jamie- Jos can best answer that question for you..
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10568
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 06:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Actually, despite a working knowledge of the disease Strangles, I have limited knowledge of vaccination research - you're getting outside my field!

There do seem to be varying results as to efficacy, but one has to note the comments about the risk of localised vaccination site reaction with IM use in that research document, which may be considered unacceptable by some despite the apparent increased protection level.
 

Jamie Lester
Neonate
Username: Jamie_l

Post Number: 3
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 11:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Jos. I have to ask what do you do for your own? I have my horses at a large boarding facility and you never know what comes in the door.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10570
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 10:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If I consider there to be sufficient threat, I would use the intra-nasal.
 

melissa
Breeding Stock
Username: Mbgirl

Post Number: 180
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 19, 2006 - 02:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mini mare had a temp of 104.3 last wed night. The vet came out the next morning. The vet took blood work and a culture from up in her nose. We are giving her Chloramphemical paste twice a day. The vet wanted me to keep her in the stall until we got the results back. The mare only ran a temp that one time, other the that is was normal. The mare has a nasty yellow nose, cough. The vet called today said she does not have strangles. He said I could let her out with the other horses now. He said she has a bad cough in her throat. I let her out, but what do you all think. Her nose is still running and cough, but eating fine, no temp.I hope I made the right call. If it is just a cold will the other horses get the cold or what?

Dixie the big mare is good right this moment.
thanks Melissa
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 184
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2006 - 01:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Melissa,
I hope your mare is feeling better, or does soon. I personally wouldn't put a symptomatic horse out with others, but that's me. Sometimes this can be hard if there is restricted amounts of space. If you are concerned still, talk to your vet.

FYI, if your vet didn't mention, if you are still continuing to treat with the Chloramphenicol (CHPC), it is VERY important that you wear gloves and wash your hands after handling this specific medication.
 

Kelly Bowman
Neonate
Username: Kelly_b

Post Number: 1
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 07:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mare is 50 days pg and has developed a cough, and a runny nose. She has no fever, normal resting respiration and heartbeat. She is feisty and eats up everything! I called my vet and many horses in the area have the same symptoms and she says it will work its way out.
My concerns are, is the coughing affecting the unborn foal?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10732
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Saturday, June 03, 2006 - 12:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

is the coughing affecting the unborn foal?

Not negatively, no.
 

Kathee McGuire
Breeding Stock
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 507
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 - 01:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Evie or Jos - in working with my new resuce mare, I have discovered two lumps in her throat right at the throat latch. They are not tender, she has no symptoms of illness. They are about half the size of an egg and shaped like an egg. You can not see them, they have to be felt. I can move them around so it is not an absess. None of my other horses have them...can you tell me what they are or might be? I have researched the web, but everything keeps going back to strangles. What does it sound like to you?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10745
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 07:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Without actually seeing them it is difficult to say, but in all probability they are enlarged glands possibly as a result of an allergy or something. It would be best to have your veterinarian evaluate them if you have concerns.
 

Kathee McGuire
Breeding Stock
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 508
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Wednesday, June 07, 2006 - 08:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

They appear to be gone today. It does sound allergy related. Are the arytenoid glands the ones affected with allergies?
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 503
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Thursday, June 08, 2006 - 01:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathee, I've come across similar type nodules/glands on horses that we've had before, I wouldn't sweat it too much if they don't appear to be ill, just watch and wait, that's my best advice.
 

Kelly Bowman
Neonate
Username: Kelly_b

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Friday, June 09, 2006 - 03:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, after monitoring vital stats during the last 2 weeks, my mare did finally get a fever;102.2F last night. I called the vet in and we are doing some blood work. The mare may have gotten a secondary infection from this viral "cough and runny nose."
Other than the runny nose,and a bit less energy than her normal self, she is not lethargic. She is eating her food and begging for goodies when I go out to the barn! I should have the lab results back tonight, and the vet left me antibiotics just in case something comes up from the lab. She recommended bathing her with water to reduce the fever and if the fever gets more than 102, then I should give her bute.
My gelding, her barn mate shows no sign of being ill. Both horses have been vaccinated with strangles, west nile, rhino, etc... in March.
 

Kelly Bowman
Neonate
Username: Kelly_b

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Saturday, June 10, 2006 - 11:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I got the blood test results back last night and she did indeed develop a secondary infection. Her WBC was high while the RBC was low. My vet is having me inject her with 20cc of Naxcel for the next 4 days followed by TMZ for 10 days after that.
This morning her temp was 100.5 and she was eating.
I asked my vet about the foal and she said the foal should be OK if we agressively treat this bacterial infection. She said when Mares in foal get really infected, their bodies release prosteglandin (sp?)and the foal will be aborted.
Hopefully this will not be the case with my mare. My vet recommended an ultrasound in December to make sure she is still in foal and is not in a false pregnancy.
I guess what will be, will be...
Any one out there with a similar experience? What was your outcome?



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