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Question about mare's Cycles and Light

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 1 » Question about mare's Cycles and Light « Previous Next »


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jen (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 66.68.29.162
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 04:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It is HOT here in Texas even though its January. Most days are around 80 degrees. We have had about 4 really cold days this winter.

All the mares are still cycling and have never stopped. They aren't under lights, but the sun during the day is hot and very strong. It feels like summer outside.

Anyway, will the mares still need to be put under lights before breeding? Does the temperature play a role, or just the length of the day? If they both paly a role is one stronger then the other? These mares are VERY much going into heat...I mean the kind of heat that makes them hang around the stallion's runs instead of coming in to eat (it takes a lot to keep these girls away from grain).

One of my mares was pasture bred on Dec 20-25th (oops). She hasn't been under lights but she was definatly cycling (chasing him around backwards peeing on him with her tail straight up ALL DAY). Could she be producing breedable follicles or was this just a fales heat? Should I have her US'ed?

What are the chances of her producing follicles in Jan with no lights but the temps around 80 degrees?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10414
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 04:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Temperature plays only a very minor role. Light is the primary stimulus. If there is insufficient light then ovulation will generally not occur. If there is sufficient light but temeperatures are very cold, then ovualtion may not occur. Note that there are exceptions, so you may get lucky.

You need to confirm that ovulation is happening in your mares before breeding. It is not uncommon (especially in warmer climates that are closer to the equator) to see mares apparently cycling year-round, but upon investigation it will be found that the majority are not ovulating (sort of a persistent transitional phase).

To recap... light is the controlling factor, heat plays only a minor secondary role. Have your mares ultrasounded...
 

Anonymous
 
Posted on Tuesday, January 24, 2006 - 01:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My pregnant mares will be kept under lights the entire length of their pregnancy as they are stabled in a barn with show horses. The lights are used to keep the coats short during the winter show season in Australia. Will this have any affect on the broodmares as far their foals are concerned? Will their gestation period be perhaps shorter? How will this affect their cycles/foal heat etc after foaling. I'm a bit worried but the only other option is to leave them outside in the mud or agist them at considerable expense.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10427
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, January 25, 2006 - 01:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It will have a tendency to shorten gestational durations by up to two weeks. Not definitive, but a tendency. After foaling, they are more likely to continue to cycle after "foal heat", whereas if not under lights and it is early in the breeding season they may relapse back into winter anestrus.
 

E Watkins
Weanling
Username: Evie

Post Number: 45
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, January 31, 2006 - 01:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos-

would it shorten the gestation to less than the requisit 320 period? as in 306 days possibly being a normal healthy foal?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10431
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Tuesday, January 31, 2006 - 10:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As the average gestational duration is anywhere between 320 and 370 days, and the use of lights can shorten the gestational duration by up to two weeks, it would be possible that one could get 306 days if one takes all the "average" extremes into consideration.
 

E Watkins
Weanling
Username: Evie

Post Number: 46
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, February 01, 2006 - 09:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos-

Thank you for the information, I feel somewhat better about the possibility of some very early foals in our barn now. The mares I've been concerned about are in the 284-286 day range now and have been swelling in their udders for close to two weeks. With more of the mares due a week or so after these mares now showing the same signs, I was becoming very concerned that we were going to loose a lot of babies this year. (all mares are stalled and the lights are on an average of 13 hours a day) Thanks again, EW



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