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Weaning- How long until mare dry's up??

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 1 » Weaning- How long until mare dry's up?? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Renee
Posted From: 203.34.9.250
Posted on Tuesday, February 01, 2005 - 06:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi,
I have weaned a 5month old colt about 3 weeks ago, and although both mare and foal are healthy, the mare is still moping alot, i would really love to give her her boy back, but she still has milk. Her bag looks empty, but if i milk her, then it still comes out quite easily. How long does it normally take a mare to dry up??
 

Jos
Posted From: 4.242.3.231
Posted on Tuesday, February 01, 2005 - 11:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Some mares can take 3-6 months to dry up, while others take only a few days - there is no standard. On top of that, with some mares, if you allow the foal back in with her even after she's dried up, she will allow them to nurse and then start to produce milk again.

Hang in there, and find a buddy for her and the foal if you can.
 

Rooty
Posted From: 69.158.152.212
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 11:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My old Morgan mare doesn't quit producing milk until mid-way through a subsequent pregnancy. Now that she hasn't had a foal in several years, she still keeps some fluid. I wouldn't exactly call it milk, it's quite watery but very easy to express.
 

Renee
Posted From: 203.34.9.250
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 04:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh ok! I do have them buddied up. My mare is in with the other broodmares, and the colt is in with a yearling colt. The colt seems happy enough, he never calls for her or anything, just the mare seems down, and she's normally such a lovely happy mare. So leave them seperated for good you think?? I am not going to geld him, so he will have to be seperated from her again in a few months, so probably better keeping them used to staying away rather than have to take him away from her again! Thanks for the info guys, big help! Also, how late in the season is normally considered too late to breed the mare. It is mid-late summer here, and the weather is still very warm. All the unbred mares still cycling, but i would like them in foal for next season. What do you think??
 

Jos
Posted From: 4.242.0.37
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2005 - 05:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As you are not planning on castrating the colt, it is probably simplest to keep them separated for good.

How late in the season is too late will depend on a variety of things, not the least of which is your own personal set-up for your horses and your local prevailing weather conditions. Remember that the foal - if born late in the season - will not have maximal growth opportunity before winter weather hits. This may be a problem if you pasture your horses year-round. If OTOH you keep your mares inside in the winter or the prevailing weather conditions are not severe in the winter, it may not be a problem.

The other issue is what you are breeding for. If breeding for your own use as a riding horse, then breeding late will not probably be a problem. If OTOH you are breeding for a horse for the show ring or racetrack, then there is a stronger desire to breed for a foaling that will occur closer to the official birthday of the breed - typically Jan. 1 in the Northern hemisphere and Aug. 1 in the Southern - so that there is maximal growht on the horse by the time it shows or races.
 

Renee
Posted From: 203.34.9.250
Posted on Sunday, February 06, 2005 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos, thanks very much. Well i breed mini's, but this will be the first year that i have my own stallion, so i wasnt sure. The winter conditions arent very severe here at all, and they are kept in yards with stables attached, so they have the choice of being inside or out. So i think i will breed these mares, and see how it goes. It just means that its going to be a late pregnancy every year if i do it this year though doesnt it.. ill have to consider that. If i breed now, then it will have then due Jan/Feb, so thats not too bad. Thanks again



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