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Submissive breeding.

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 1 » Submissive breeding. « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Rusty
Posted From: 152.163.100.13
Posted on Wednesday, January 12, 2005 - 11:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi: I a Have Stallion, of whom I am vey proud, and several mares. I keep them all together in the winter to save money and effort despite the fact that I do not want them bred.
Today I got a new three year old paint mare. I gave her time to get to know the stallion behind the teasing wall before letting them all out together. She showed no sign of heat. But when I put them out together, She stood for him. I believe she was just intimidated, and was simply being submissive. I'm fully aware that its not impossible that she is one of a handful of horses that will cycle in the winter, and that its even possible that I got her on a day when she happened to be in heat. But is it more likly that she was just being submissive? Will a mare somtimes stand when she's not in estrus as a submissive behavior? Sorry This isn't in my course notes. (still the best equine book I own)
 

outlawpaints
Posted From: 64.53.77.245
Posted on Thursday, January 13, 2005 - 10:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

HI rusty.. We have a mare that is cycling. I guess it could be because of the strange weather we have been having. it has been in the 70's here during the day and 50's at night for a while now. feels more like spring than winter and we let her out with our stud and she stood for him and let him breed with her. we will just have to wait and see if she took, but she let him breed 5 times yesterday.. She is also our oldest mare. 20. she is in excellent shape, so I guess we will see in a couple of days.. just my two cents worth....
 

Rusty
Posted From: 152.163.100.13
Posted on Thursday, January 13, 2005 - 02:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Outlaw. Temprature is not supposed to matter as numerous studies have inidcated.
But none the less,
Here, in Missouri, we're enjoying the brutal part of winter, ice storm after ice storm. and temps consistantly below freezing.
It might be worth mentioning that this mare has a really long winter coat. I wonder Jos... You have made several refrences to the fact that a mare will lose her winter coat if she's exposed to phototropic stimulation. Is it possible that there is a deeper link between coat and anestrus?
Can we consider our mares in anestrus when the coat thickens up?
How about the other way around. When we see shedding, can we expect cycling?
Thanks
Rusty
 

Eagle View Arabians
Posted From: 205.188.116.13
Posted on Thursday, January 13, 2005 - 09:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Rusty, I have a 20 year old mare with a very thick winter coat. Temps have been in the 30's here in Washington but she went in full blown heat and would have let my stud breed her (if I hadn't kept them apart). Now if she's actually ovulating is another story but I guess my point is, you just never know! :-)
 

Jos
Posted From: 4.245.123.15
Posted on Thursday, January 13, 2005 - 11:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Submissive behaviour is a possibility, as is the fact that she is one of the few mares that will continue to cycle year-round. Not all of those mares will be ovulating though, so breeding her will not necessarily result in pregnancy, despite the cycling. (BTW - you should find this situation covered in your course notes under "nymphomania" in "breeding problem mares").

Temperature has a slight effect in onset of cyclity. The primary driving force however is light duration/intensity. For example, mares in Colorado in March will generally still be in winter anestrus. Mares in Arizona in March - just a few hundred miles away - will mostly be cycling. The amount/degree of light is about the same, but it is considerably warmer in AZ. In order for heat to make a significant difference however, it needs to be +/- 20 degrees different from the normal for +/- 30 days, so the "it's been weird weather this spring/year" is not really a viable argument unless it has been extended and significant weird weather (sorry outlawpaints! :-)).

Coat thickness is somewhat correlated to cyclicity. The same stimulus for the onset of cycling (light) also causes coat loss, so for example putting a mare under lights will also cause her to lose her coat (as I've noted before). If you have a mare presented for breeding early in the year with a thick coat, she is quite probably still anestrus. Conversely, if she is shed out, she is more likely to be cycling, but that is not a guarantee! Remember that mare is a four-letter word so it's not an absolute!
 

outlawpaints
Posted From: 64.53.77.245
Posted on Friday, January 14, 2005 - 08:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Our mare has not got a thick coat. it has been in the 70's for the past month and a half or two except for 3 days in december when it got cold. other than that it has been in the 60's and 70's. some of our mares are shedding out...that is how long is has been unseasonably warm. we live in South Carolina. Thanks Jos. who know's. i guess we will just have to wait and find out....
 

Rusty
Posted From: 205.188.116.13
Posted on Friday, January 14, 2005 - 10:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This has been a great discussion, and as always I have great respect for those who partisipate.
As spring rolls around, and the people want to begin bringing thier mares, I will note if they are shed out yet. Not as a final litmus test, but just another consideration as to when they might begin cycling.
As for this mare, there is only one way to know for sure if she is bred. But it will be much cheaper to just to give a shot of prostaglandin???? and if I do that, when would be the ideal time to give such a shot if the first breeding took place yesterday?
Thanks again
Rusty
 

Cathy
Posted From: 63.228.245.23
Posted on Friday, January 14, 2005 - 11:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Rusty you have to wait a week and it needs to be given before a month passes. Cathy
 

Rooty
Posted From: 69.196.103.102
Posted on Friday, January 14, 2005 - 12:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Our mares usually don't cycle over the winter and they are this year!



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