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Mares Heat season

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 1 » Mares Heat season « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

outlawpaints
Posted From: 64.53.77.129
Posted on Monday, November 22, 2004 - 08:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi! I have a mare that is almost 20 and she had a baby in august. we lost the baby 3 days later, but was wondering.... how late in the year does a mare come into season? when I moved her the other day she backed up to our stud, winked and lifted her tail ready to accept him.... is this unusal for them to be in season this late in the year.. we live in South Carolina... Any information would be helpful. Thanks
 

Patricia L. Wiles
Neonate
Username: Tajsultani

Post Number: 1
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 07:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry to hear she lost the foal. I bred and raised Arabs for over 20 yrs., and each mare is different - some come into heat all year long, especially if they are in southern areas. It is normal especially if they are well cared for. One reason mares in the wild tend to quit cycling in winter is to avoid having a foal at a time when there is no grass, very cold weather, etc. Spring/summer is optimum time to recover from birth, and for the foal to prosper.
 

Anonymous
 
Posted on Sunday, June 19, 2005 - 01:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am very sorry also that you lost your foal. I believe that mares can go on heat all year round but it is when you want them to have the foal and also when can you stand the stallion at stud. i have a stallion that can bring a mare into season if she is not currently in heat. I have a question for you? I have a mare that is 7 months in foal and is due in October and I have had to put the stallion in with her and now she is parting her tail as through she is in heat she is backing up to him and he is responding, will this effect the foal at all? And after they have mated she is twisting around nibbleing on her belly. At first I throught that she was going to give birth but she has 4 months to go yet? THis is about the second time that she has come into season while being in foal?????????
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.116
Posted on Sunday, June 19, 2005 - 01:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would be very cautious with her being so receptive to the stallion. If he is in fact penetrating her, she could loose the foal.

She may be responding with a submissive behavior towards the stallion. Even if she is showing a true heat, this is not too uncommon. If she is allowing him to mount and penetrate, this is uncommon and dangerous to the foal. If the cevical plug is knocked out too soon, infection can set in and the foal could be aborted.

I would suggest that they be separated as soon as possibe until after she has saftely foaled.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10160
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Sunday, June 19, 2005 - 04:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Outlawpaints: I think your question was ably answered by Patricia L. Wiles.

Anonymous - I feel that it would be best if I made a couple of comments about some of your observations so that other readers of this board don't get the wrong idea :-)

  • Mares are seasonally polyestrus, which means that most mares will cycle regularly for a portion of the year, and then stop cycling for the remainder of the year (winter). This will be seen in about 85% of mares, so although some may cycle ("go into heat") year-round, most won't. As Patricia notes, those mares that are better fed and closer to the equator will tend to be the ones that cycle year-round, but it is also worth noting that although a goodly portion of those mares may be showing estrus, they may in fact not be ovulating during the winter season.
  • If you have a stallion that "can bring a mare into heat", you should definitely contact your local veterinary research university, as this has not been seen in other stallions! :-) Mares in estrus that were not exposed to a stallion and therefore had no stimulus may "suddenly" start to show estrus ("heat") display when exposed to a stimulus (the stallion); or mares not in estrus exposed to the stallion may show submissive behaviour that mimics estrus, but they are not really in estrus. There is a huge and complex hormonal cascade that mares must go through to come into estrus (follow that link for the article), and simply exposing them to a stallion will not precipitate that cascade.
TX Breeder is right on the money about removing your pregnant mare from the stallion - if the damage has not already been done, it almost certainly will be, and you will end up with an abortion if the stallion keeps breeding the pregnant mare.

I suppose she is confirmed pregnant? Did you have her ultrasounded or palpated recently? She may not be pregnant...
 

Anonymous
 
Posted on Sunday, June 19, 2005 - 05:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

TX Breeder - I will remove her from the stallion as soon as it stops raining here. She is allowing him to mount her and do a full breed. She has been backing up to him alot and most of the time he is not interested but he has been interested twice.
JOS - I am sorry for not expanding the definition for what I was refering to in my last post but you did a very good job there. Yes my mare is in foal she only has 4 months too go and she is heavly showing and you can see the foal moving at times.
There is nothing that means more to me then the well being of all my horses and if I had of known this, would be a issue then I definatly wouldn't have let the stallion in the same paddock with her. But I throught with her already being in foal that I wouldn't even have this problem but I guess I was wrong. So as for her nibbleing at her belly??? I throught that she was getting ready to give birth it all made sence apart from the fact that she would be 4 months early. I hope everything is fine.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10162
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Sunday, June 19, 2005 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm not sure I'd wait for the rain to stop... the stallion probably won't... :-(
 

Anonymous
 
Posted on Sunday, June 19, 2005 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was just looking at them this morning as they came around the hause and she is still backing up to him but he doesnt seem to be interested. She was even doing this when I had her in with a gelding that was cut proud (Not mine) Maybe you can help me with a couple of other things to: I have the stallion running in a paddock around my hause and in this paddock I have a young gelding he is a year and 4 months old and I was very worried about them running together and this morning they were nipping at each other is that just playing?????? I am just new that all this "owning a stallion" bit and I am just worried that I am doing things wrong. I have just started breeding coloured horses so this is all new to me but It is a life long passion I have had. I really don't want to reck this stallion becuase he is a 100% breeder and very smart and well trained. Just a bit nervous about everything!!!!!!!
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10164
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Monday, June 20, 2005 - 09:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What you are seeing is probably play - the boys will play rough. If the stallion however is going at the gelding teeth bared and ears back, that probably isn't playing.

I would encourage you to get someone local to you that has a good reputation and lots of experience with stallions (and these people are few and far between - don't think because someone has had a stallion for a while that they know a lot!) to take a look at your set up and generally help you with everything before you get into trouble. Handling a stallion is really not something that can be learned over the Internet.
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.213
Posted on Monday, June 20, 2005 - 10:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Even the proud cut youngster may mount and penetrate a mare.

If the yearling is really proud cut, he may be seen as a threat to the stallion. You could have a territorial dispute on your hands.

As Jos suggested, get help with these horses. Your decisions could make your life long passion a dream come true or a nightmare for all concerned.



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