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Maiden mare acts like a stud

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 1 » Maiden mare acts like a stud « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Sandy
Posted on Wednesday, October 01, 2003 - 06:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I just recently purchased a 5 year old Appaloosa mare that has never been bred. When she arrived at my farm, one of my other mares was in heat, and this new mare acted just like a stallion would, teasing her,(and aggressively I might add) following her around, there was even one point where I seriously thought she was going to mount her! Once this mare finally went out of heat, the two of them became good pasture pals.
Well now, the new mare is in heat, and she is doing the same thing to the other mares, only SHE is the one in heat, not them. And she exhibits heat very strongly, a lot of winking and squirting, to the point that she stays in the "breed" position and tries to walk while in that position. I let one of my stallions tease her a little today, just to see if she would show anything to him, and there again, she acted more like a stallion would. Rearing, striking, squealing, all of that fun stuff, but at the same time, winking and squirting.
I guess what I'm afraid of is that she is one of those mares that suffers from testicular feminization, at least I think that is what it is called. Where they are basically a hermaphrodite.

Does anyone know how common this is, and if you think it would be possible that is what is up with this mare?

Any help is appreciated.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, October 02, 2003 - 09:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had a friend whose mare became very stallion-esque and ended up having a tumor or a large cyst on one of her ovaries. I couldn't say for sure if your mare has the exact same behaviors, but I would certainly have the vet check her reproductively.
 

Sandy
Posted on Thursday, October 02, 2003 - 05:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I hadn't thought of something like that.
Was your friend's mare ever capable of getting in foal? I bought this mare to eventually breed, I was hoping next spring actually, so I guess I probably should have her examined.
Thanks.
 

Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 09:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry for the lag time on this response. I don't know if the mare was ever bred. I believe she was sold soon after surgery to remove the problem (as I said, I can't remember if it was a large cyst or a tumor) to recoup the surgery costs. It was sad because she was a gorgeous, well bred mare and an incerdible competitor.
Good luck. I hope yours is an easy fix or no problem at all!
 

flyingrose
Posted From: 207.136.41.44
Posted on Monday, March 21, 2005 - 11:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mares who act like stallions may just be very dominate; however, frequently they have hormone issues, small ovaries or ovarian cysts. Find a good repro Vet and have her evaluated, preferably while she is in heat.
 

Crystal Holtzman
Neonate
Username: Azippintribute

Post Number: 1
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Tuesday, August 16, 2005 - 07:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

On a positive note: I have a pregnant mare that always acts Stud like in her first and second term of pregnancy. She has been examined and ultra sounded with no cysts. She has normal ovaries and tends to get in foal on the first breeding. Just hormone changes make her studish. I even use her to help get other mares into heat for breeding.
 

Lisa Weir
Nursing Foal
Username: Pals_pal

Post Number: 15
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Wednesday, August 17, 2005 - 08:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We have a mare who had a tumour on one ovary as a maiden of about the same age. She had the ovary removed and went on to have 5 foals.

She has been retired now as she finds rectal exams and live cover painful. We assume this is due to scarring as she's only sensitive on the side of the removed ovary.

But before worrying about that, have your vet check her out. I've seen many a maiden mare with the same behaviours. Some just need time in the herd, learning to be more feminine. One needed drugs and hobbles to cover. That was traumatic, but she was a lovely mum. We expected her to be better next time, but no.
No need to panic, until your vet gives you the verdict.



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