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Nursemares-term and use?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Nurse Mares Available or Needed » Nursemares-term and use? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 54
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 12:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Please tell me if I have this correct.

1. A nursemare may be a mare that lost her foal, and thus can be sent to be a "momma" to an orphaned foal.

2. A nursemare may be a Non-Lactating mare that loves foals, so she can be a foster momma, without the milk? That is, the foal is fed a suppliment.

Am I correct on that?

Another question. How does one know the mare that lost her foal will accept a new foal?
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 589
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 01:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A nursemare can be a mare that is TAKEN from her newborn foal to raise another "more expensive" baby. The nursemare's foal then has to be raised an orphan.
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 61
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 02:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh, I hadn't thought of that one. Well, with the 2008 season here, it will be interesting to see of there are posts for nursemare needed. I see there were several for 2007.
 

Leonard Kistner
Weanling
Username: Len

Post Number: 27
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 03:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

#1... That is correct. Most of these mares do not work as Nursemares. They aren't true Nursemares. The people working with them are inexperenced and don't have the knowledge of getting the mare to except the foal. Vets included. #2.... No thats not correct. That would be a baby sitter or companion. The Nursemare has milk and does feed the foal. The latter being the best way to raise an orphan foal. last ??... You don't know that. Thats a gamble you take when you get a mare that has lost her foal. Sometimes they work and other times they don't. The true nursemare will except the orphan most of the time. It depends where you get the Nursemare. Theres one service that guarintees her Nursemares. last poster... The Nursemare is NOT taken from her newborn foal. Not at our place. The Mare and Foal are together for a month or even more in most cases. There are occasions where a mare with a newborn, maybe a week old, would be needed. This is not the norm. Many times when the Nursemare foal gets home its put on another nursemare until she gets the call. Most of the foals end up with a baby sitter after they are weaned. Then sold to good homes The Nursemare is not always taken to raise a more expencive foal. Sometimes its for a twin of any breed. A foal that will not drink from a bucket or bottle, that can happen at rescues and does. Nursemare foals are raised in groups of 4-6. They Eat, play and sleep together. Their well taken care of. Last... There are always calls for the Nursemares. The percentages are 5% of the mares foaling will not make it. Another 2% will reject and maybe another 2% - 3% will colic latter. Most all foalings go without problems, but there are that few that don't. Sandy gets at least 75-100 calls per season. Some are regular clients. Then there are some that are new. Some get Nursemares and some don't for a host of reasons. The Nursemare is a life saver to many each year. Wether it be an Orphan Foal or a person.
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 202
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 - 01:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Leonard,
My one experience with a nurse mare went well and we just got darn lucky. Had a foal whose mama didn't outright reject him, but would literally run away from the foal and he had a devil of a time trying to nurse. She never got aggressive with him, just would literally "run off" from him and the poor little thing would run around and pant after her, bleating like some little goat or something. She would let him nurse but you had to tie her up, then we got into hobbling her so she couldn't move around. Okay, so then we started milking her and bottle feeding him. What fun! NOT!
Anywho...when the foal was about a week old, a good friend had a Belgian mare that foaled and had milk "for all". She was a big ole lovey-dovey gal who immediately accepted our poor little foal a couple of days after hers was born (we gave the draft mare's baby a couple of days to get its colustrum, etc., then put our foal in with it).
We got lucky and this ole gal was a wonderful mama to both her foal and our poor little sad one. (Ours about needed a stepstool to nurse from her, but he got it done.)

I have two questions: First, are draft mares the best types for nurse mares? I have heard this now from several people but also realize that other breeds of mares are nurse mares. Our own experience with this draft mare was wonderful and she was truly a "gentle giant" and just had lots of milk.
The reason I am asking is that our friend now has expressed an interest in selling this ole girl and I am wondering if it would be worth it to buy her just to have her around "in case". She would be about 15 or 16 now and has had a baby every year, he is breeding her back to his Belgian stallion this spring and her colts seem to sell fast around here.
I have one mare we are breeding this year that has ligament damage to one of her teats and we are unsure about how the nursing will go (on that side, the other teat seems to be okay).

I'm thinking this draft mare may be a good investment. Our friend is like "Ah, I don't know how much to ask for her ($'s), make me an offer".

What do you think would be a decent offer for a nursemare?
 

Leonard Kistner
Weanling
Username: Len

Post Number: 28
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 12:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well first, she would be like money in the bank. If you needed her you already have her. If someone else needed her you could charge a fee to off set her cost. Nursemares run up to $3500.00 for the use of them for 6 mos. I would think if you offered $1000.00,???? Draft mares are for the most part sweet giants. BUT they eat more and can fill a muck tub at one shot. They give to much milk for one ,say TB foal to handle. They tend to be very aggressive with other horses. Sandys Nursemare Service Has one draft mare,shire named Bridgit. The best nursemare breed is the Appaloosa. They are good milk prodcers. Great temperment,easy keepers????, and you can trust them. Sandy has a herd of about 65, that are Apps and App cross. 5 to 6 generations and all most all from an App that she rode in the great American horse race back in 1976. Sugar, that was her name and she started the nursemare service, that is Sandys Nursemare Service today. These mares will take an orphan 98% of the time with no problems. They have the mothering thing down to a science. These Nursemares have been known to lay down next to a foal that couldn't get up so it could nurse. Some foals would nurse one side and not the other. The Nursemare would fix that. They would put a foal between them and the wall so it would nurse that teat. They will comfort a foal that has been beat up by its mother, Calm it down befor getting it to nurse. Some foals are scared stiff of a horse after its own mother tried to kill it. Sooo the Nursemare of choice is the App and App cross. There are others that make good nursemares, but the common one is the App. Hope I helped Len
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 223
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 02:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Leonard.
Now our friend is humming and hawing around. I don't think he really wants to sell her. I think it was just something he shot his mouth off about one day and has now reconsidered. She is a really good ole gal.

I would buy her if I thought he was serious because I think one that you "know" is a great asset. Like I said I have a mare that has a damaged teat ligament and I just wonder how the nursing will go next year ---- that is if she will get prego. She seems to be a "party girl" right now up at the breeding farm! :-)
 

Pita
Weanling
Username: Pita

Post Number: 50
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Monday, June 16, 2008 - 10:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

HI everyone, Unfortunatley I lost a foal yesterday morning to Neonatal Iso. This mare has foaled 6 times to the same stallion never a problem. This one was born 10 days early, mare retianed some placenta, baby was good until 2:00 am then I bottle fed all morning, and then at noon was perfect. up and running etc.vitals good, igg over 800 super duper, Lungs were clear. No other signs then I thought she was in a little distress by her ears. THen 3 hours later I was trying to give her meds to get her up to the clinic. She died in my arms 15 minutes later.

I am so guilt ridden because it's the first foal I lost in 10 years and I was feeding her during the night which actually was killing her, but the university said there would of been no way to know.

I got a call from a friend that lost a mare on Weds.. She needs a mare so hopefully this mare will accept this baby.

They are coming this afternoon. Anyone have any idea's how to get her to accept this filly?

Last night I left the passed foal for hours in her stall and then tranqed her to get her out of there the mare when nuts until 5:00 am.. She is now weaving and settling down, but omg..

I hope this works. It would help both of them out.
 

judy cervantes/chenoa born 3/30/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Judy1

Post Number: 451
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Monday, June 16, 2008 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

PITA,ALL I CAN SAY IS I AM SOOOOOO SORRY FOR YOUR LOSS,I DONT HAVE ANY EXPERIENCE WITH WHAT YOU ARE DEALING WITH NOW BUT I KNOW SOMEONE ON HERE WILL GIVE YOU SOME GOOD ADVISE,GOOD LUCK !!
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 358
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Monday, June 16, 2008 - 01:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Pita,
Here is a link to a good article about orphans. There is a decent section about nurse mares and getting them to accept other foals in it.

http://www.mirrorkbranch.com/article7.html
 

Leonard Kistner
Weanling
Username: Len

Post Number: 29
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Tuesday, June 17, 2008 - 07:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Most all situations are different. Mares are different,foals are different. Sandys Nursemares walk in a stall and except the foal right a way. Off the trailer and in the stall. Done. That is 98% of the time. How I can help you is, take it slow, don't let the mare have any head contact and don't let her move around. do this for a while. let the foal nurse as much as it wants. Not to the point of the mare getting sore. Introduce them slowly. Remember all mares are not Nursemares. Depending on how it all goes,she might have to be restrained behind a board or cargo band. Thus a straight stall. The foal can still nurse but the mare can't hurt the foal. Hay bales behind the mare. Hay infront so she can eat. keep it up high. Water along side. Your going to have to play by play this. Good luck.
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1734
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, June 17, 2008 - 12:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Pita~How is it going? Would love an update on your mare and the orphan foal...

Hugs, Jan
 

Pita
Yearling
Username: Pita

Post Number: 52
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Tuesday, June 17, 2008 - 02:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

http://www.applewood-farms.net/eviesnewbaby.html
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 363
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Tuesday, June 17, 2008 - 02:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Pita,
Your page made me tear up. I'm glad everything seems to be working out okay.
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1735
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, June 17, 2008 - 06:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Pita~ That is tremendous news! So glad that the introduction went well. You are a good person to open your heart and home to the little orphan...Hugs
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1537
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2008 - 09:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm so happy things are going well for the two of them. I hope they'll continue to grow closer.



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