MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

What color and club foot?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Equine Genetics » What color and club foot? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Hobby (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 68.216.187.22
Posted on Tuesday, July 05, 2005 - 12:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am going to breed my mare to a palimino paint she is a sorrel what color will I most likely get? And my mare has a club foot if I breed her to a stallion with good feet what are the chances of getting a club foot? Oh and one more thing the mare has a stripe the stallion a bald face which is more likely for the foal? Thanks
 

Kay Baxter
Weanling
Username: Kaykay

Post Number: 30
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Tuesday, July 05, 2005 - 01:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The chances are still pretty good that you will get a club footed foal. Please dont take this the wrong way but in my opinion i would never breed a horse with this fault. There are way too many nice horses to breed to have to breed one with a big fault. While there are no perfect horses-- when we take the responsibility of breeding we have to try our best not to breed more faults.
 

Bunny Novak
Neonate
Username: Bunny

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Wednesday, July 06, 2005 - 08:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I bought a bay mare who is due any day.She was bred to a buckskin stud.I have no info on the parents to these two.Any ideas/guesses on color of the foal?I was told she has only thrown bay foals so far.Also-Kay,I agree about not breeding a horse with a clubfoot.Why take the chance,of having a defect such as that.Thanks much!
 

Cathy
Weanling
Username: Cathy

Post Number: 31
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, July 06, 2005 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bunny Novak if yur mare is NOT homozygous for black or agouti you can get black bay buckskin sorrel palomino and smoky black. If either of them is homo for black throw out the red based colors. If either is homo for agouti throw out all the solid colors.
Because both horses are black based and both have agouti your highest chances are for bay or buckskin.
 

Hobby (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 68.216.187.41
Posted on Wednesday, July 06, 2005 - 06:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is the worst web site I have ever been to! There needs to be a web site for crape hangers such as all of you. And by the way the vet said that club feet are no in the genetics. My mare got a club foot from being to big in the womb.
 

Deena
Breeding Stock
Username: Morganslil1

Post Number: 109
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, July 06, 2005 - 07:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Contracted tendons, Club foot, Knuckling)
Flexor tendon disorders are associated with postural and foot changes, lameness, and debility. There are Congenital and acquired causes.
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.109
Posted on Wednesday, July 06, 2005 - 09:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hobby- Sorry that you took Kay's response so personally. I have had a mare with a club foot, and I did breed her. She was very slightly clubbed and did have a normal, healthy foal. I did pay extra attention to this foal in relation to her foot care.

I think that I would consider how extreme your mare's condition is, along with information about her early care. Many cases are helped early on, or made more extreme by poor care. I would also consider her bloodline, and what exactly you would like to do with her. If you can afford the extra care that the foal may need, then it is up to you. Keep in mind that if you happen to end up with an extreme club footed foal, it may be harder to sell at a later time.

As Deena pointed out, some are congenital and some are acquired. I hope that your situation is that it was acquired.

Are you hoping for a palomino paint?
 

Hobby (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 68.216.187.41
Posted on Thursday, July 07, 2005 - 12:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tx, I have known my mare since birth and being to big in the womb and poor care after birth caused her to get her club. I thank you for being kind and understanding. My vet and I are both prepaired for a club (if there is one) and I am going to breed because I love the way my mare is built and her personality and want to keep her blood lines going. I am going to keep the foal and have no intention to ever sell it. I would like it to be a palomino paint but palomino or even sorrel is fine. I am hoping more for built and personality than color. Do you know if a mare with a stipe and a stud with a bald face which is more likely in the foal? And I am going to breed her AI do you know of any other palomino paint studs that TS? Thanks
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.142
Posted on Thursday, July 07, 2005 - 06:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have seen far too many "perfect" horses with horrible personalities. I too breed for a great mind as well as all of the other nice extras. Color being one!

I would look back into the pedigree to see what markings were on the faces of both sides. If there are a lot of white faces, (or white anywhere else)then I would suspect that your foal may have a larger white marking like a full blaze.

A sorrel mare bred to a palomino has a good chance of throwing another palomino. The paint part may be tricky! Are there any paints in your mares pedigee? Is she a Quarter Horse?
 

Lisa Zizovski
Neonate
Username: Megagain

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Friday, July 08, 2005 - 08:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The clubbed foot topic is an interesting one.

I have a mare, now for sale, who threw two club footed babies from different sires. All of the research I have done shows no history of clubbiness in her pedigree, but it is obviously there somewhere.

In researching the topic, I learned that the problem is on the rise in thoroughbreds. They suspect from excessive inbreeding (again, none of that in my mare!) so are hoping that soon there will be enough concern to get some research funding. Most of those babies get put to sleep rather promptly! I was able to find homes for both of mine, but it is not a problem I would ever encourage having bred on.

Hobby, was your mare born with the club or did it develop as she got older. Many horses do not show the problem until they hit around 9 months of age. Just curious as to how she was foaled for my own research.
 

Hobby (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 68.216.187.22
Posted on Monday, July 11, 2005 - 12:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tx, Yes my mare is a quarter horse and her half sisters are paints. The horses on her side have stripes and snips. The stud I am breeding her to has almost a bald face, most of his foals have stripes and I am not sure what his dam or sire have yet.
Lisa,
My mare was to tight in the womb and when she was a suckling whe was hurt and didn't put any weight on her foot due to a barbed wire injury. Before I had her, I would never put a foal in a barbed wire pen. But then after not putting weight on it her feet were not taken care of. What kind of do you have that had the club footed foals?
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.200
Posted on Tuesday, July 12, 2005 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Are the half sisters by a paint stallion?
 

Hobby (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 68.216.187.23
Posted on Tuesday, July 12, 2005 - 10:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No my mare has the same sire and they all three have differnt dams.
 

Cathy Hill
Neonate
Username: Smoothmule

Post Number: 8
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Saturday, September 09, 2006 - 01:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Club foot is hereditary. If your mare has it, don't breed her. If you happen to choose a stallion carrying the gene to produce a club foot too, the foal will have it. There is no test to determine if the stallion does or does not carry a gene for this deformity but why risk it?
It does take 2 genes, one from each parent to make it happen. It can cause pain and suffering later on, why would anyone do that?
We adopted a little rescue pony with 1 club foot and as she got older it caused a lot of problems and pain even wiht excellent vet care. Who would even consider the possibility?
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 319
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Saturday, September 09, 2006 - 02:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cathy,
Club foots are not always genetic. They can be congenital or acquired. In most circumstances, even severe club foots can be corrected with nutritional changes, trimming, and/or surgery.

One of my colts born this year perfectly healthy with great legs. When I had to change feed for a short period of time, he got "club-ish" in his front end due to nutritional change (I have to special order his food....and it didn't get put on the truck). He was extremely mild.
He is a large colt...with a high growth rate. After consulting multiple specialists, I took him to Texas A&M university. They did the check ligament surgery on him.
He was considered to have acquired minimal club foot in the right front leg, slight in the left.More in the right because that was his "lead" foot when he grazed. Every specialist I came in contact with specifically stated that his acquired mild club was NOT genetic, and the one who did his surgery is one of the leading orthopedists in the US. Told me it was unnecessary to geld him for this reason (as I would have).
The condition is MORE common in rapidly growing foals. Dietary imbalances have been directly linked to leg issues (dod's etc).
Time will tell if he is worthy of keeping his testicles....he is a GREAT gelding prospect, but will have to be above superior to be a stallion.
To date, his legs remain correct and he now stands 14.2 as a 7 month old.



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US